overprescribe

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o·ver·pre·scribe

 (ō′vər-prĭ-skrīb′)
v. o·ver·pre·scribed, o·ver·pre·scrib·ing, o·ver·pre·scribes
v.intr.
To prescribe an excessive amount of a medication.
v.tr.
To prescribe (a medication) in excess of the amount needed.

o′ver·pre·scrip′tion (-skrĭp′shən) n.

overprescribe

(ˌəʊvəprɪsˈkraɪb)
vb (tr)
(Pharmacology) to prescribe too much of (a medication, etc)
Translations

overprescribe

[əʊvəprɪsˈkraɪb] (Pharm, Med)
A. VIrecetar demasiados medicamentos
B. VTrecetar sin control
References in periodicals archive ?
We urge DEA to take another critical step by requiring prescriber education and training to prevent overprescribing and save lives.
Whether through a member portal or EHR, once a payer or provider has access to analyzed information they are well positioned to help their patients and society improve clinical outcomes, such as addressing why 20 percent of the population do not come back for follow-up visits nor fill their prescriptions; enhancing participation in wellness management programs; reducing avoidable costs by identifying actions or care plans that can lower the chance of complications or the continuation of adverse outcomes; and minimizing fraud and abuse--for example, by identifying an orthopedic surgeon overprescribing Xanax or another controlled substance.
Provider perception of patient expectations for an antibiotic is important, because it has been shown to be a reliable predictor of overprescribing, which might contribute to preventable side effects, adverse drug events and antibiotic resistance.
Perhaps one of the strongest issues in overprescribing is the desire to avoid complaints, he said.
said, "Physicians should aim to control pain and improve patient satisfaction while avoiding overprescribing opioids.
She said there was no evidence that the psychiatrists had compromised their own patients' health by overprescribing the drug.
One of the group's lead researchers, Dr Nick Francis, says the overprescribing of antibiotics in primary care is largely to blame for the rising rate of antimicrobial resistance.
The recent feature focused on the rise of antimicrobial stewardship to address one key problem: overprescribing.
They said that doctors need to take some responsibility for overprescribing the medications in humans as well, although the Consumers Report poll found that 80 percent of doctors think they are already taking steps to do so.
Reasons for the high rates of opiate abuse in New England range from overprescribing by doctors and drug dealers in major urban areas recognizing untapped markets to a lack of detox beds and treatment programs.
Doctors and advanced nurses have competing studies on who better controls costs by not overprescribing drugs and not ordering unnecessary tests.
The stunning correlation between the sales of opioids and overdose deaths, and the quadrupling of both in the past decade, implicates overprescribing as the primary cause of the opioid epidemic.