overpromise

overpromise

(ˌəʊvəˈprɒmɪs)
vb (intr)
to promise more than can be delivered
References in periodicals archive ?
'We believe that we should not overpromise to anyone whether it's the US or NATO,' said the PPP chairman.
"The prime minister should not overpromise on Afghanistan and pretend that we can solve all the problems there.
Many airline executives know they need fast, reliable Wi-Fi to keep pace with competitors, so they overpromise what they can provide.
However, it is important to continue the research on this topic so parents, educators, and policymakers do not overpromise on the benefits of speaking a second language, noted Nils Jaekel, clinical assistant professor at the varsity.
But asked whether he would guarantee people wouldn't die in such a situation, he wouldn't go quite that far, telling Sky News he didn't want to "overpromise."
"I don't want to overpromise, because we have to look at other factors, but definitely we want to be faster, cheaper.
Martyn James, of customer complaints website Resolver, said: "Never undersell or overpromise, as the old ad industry adage goes.
It also determines if a candidate accepts a job offer or not.That said, HR managers are often hard-pressed to identify and compete for good talent and might therefore overpromise in an effort to get a candidate to sign up for the role.
The market opportunity for AirBar has not been realized, and the marketing opportunities have failed because AirBar was never a fit with any capability possessed by the management of NEON...significant overpromise, underperform.
"Now we have the overpromise of liquidity in some sectors.
Almost half (47 percent) of marketers consider Al to be overhyped, far more than other industry buzzwords, while 43 percent of marketers believe vendors overpromise and underdeliver when it comes to Ai.
Cynics say politicians regularly overpromise and underdeliver to their people, especially when it comes to outright 'revolution' or change.