overpromote

overpromote

(ˌəʊvəprəˈməʊt)
vb (tr)
to promote to a level that cannot be fulfilled
References in periodicals archive ?
Al-Qa'ida will likely be careful not to overpromote Hamza in order to suppress possible questions of succession or challenges to the current senior leadership cadre, and it may curb his outreach in order to avoid compromising his personal security.
These overestimates lead even well-meaning managers to issue unsupportable amounts of debt and unscrupulous managers to overpromote their firms vigorously and to issue bogus debt and equity with abandon.
The potential for local leaders to overpromote development for electoral gain is substantiated by extant research.
If retailers overpromote HDTV, "consumers may put off analog TV purchases, which are an important conduit for selling other types of products, such as surround sound, speakers and DVD," he said.
Smith both that the civil war had a fissuring effect on historiography, removing it from the putative "neutrality" of the early Stuart era, and that the measure of this and other changes is to be found in writers other than Clarendon, it may be going a bit too far to say that "the civil war made modern English history writing what it is." This seems to overpromote the midcentury historians such as May and Hobbes at the expense of those Jacobeans like Camden and Daniel on whose shoulders they rested; and it ignores the fact that history-writing by 1640 included, rather than excluded, the antiquarian investigation and natural history.
Moreover, its prospects remain somewhat clouded by miscommunications and a tendency to overpromote its achievements.
* Don't overpromote company and product names: Unless a brand name is so well established that it becomes the best reason to buy a product (and even then, "such positioning is weak and easy to counter," Merrin warns), company logos and product names shouldn't be treated as a prominent part of the package's overall design.