overreport

overreport

(ˌəʊvərɪˈpɔːt)
vb (tr)
to report too frequently or in too much detail
References in periodicals archive ?
Selected hospitals with high inpatient death rates were more likely to overreport heart disease and renal disease, and underreport cancer as an underlying cause of death.
1993) noted in their original ASR article that some "individuals in others countries [might be] less likely to overreport their church attendance than are Americans" (p.
more common stockouts) that means women there are more likely than women in other countries to miss reinjection or resupply appointments and, thus, overreport their contraceptive use.
He noted that there can be variability in clinician assessments, and patients can both underreport and overreport symptoms.
Recent studies show that the tire pressure gauges at nearly 20 percent of all service stations overreport tire pressure on a 35-psi tire by at least 4 psi.
Second, individuals who spend less time completing a task may be less inclined to underreport time, and potentially more inclined to overreport time, in order to indicate that they put forth a reasonable effort on the task.
s claim that those who work longer hours tend to overreport their hours.
The fact that people tend to overreport how much they exercise when surveyed makes the findings "particularly robust," she said.
is alternatively used for identifying subjects who remarkably under- or overreport their energy intakes, by dividing their energy intake to basal metabolic rate (EI:BMR) (1,5,12-14).
Various studies over the years have suggested that Americans may overreport their attendance at religious services when compared with other objective measures of their actual attendance.
Chapters that follow cover symptom validity tests and techniques for identifying negative response bias; the effectiveness of tests to identify psychological symptom overreport; the ability of standard psychological tests to detect overreport, including post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms; test scoring and interpretation; major flaws in reports; common misperceptions about mild traumatic brain injury; and how to protect a report from attack during testimony and common methods used to discredit neuropsychologists and their data.
Stensvold and colleagues recognize that self-reports can be inaccurate, but people tend to overreport the amount of time they spend exercising, rather than underreport.