overservice

overservice

(ˌəʊvəˈsɜːvɪs)
vb (tr)
to give more service than required to (something)
References in periodicals archive ?
(109.) Veda Rammohan et al., Effects of Dram Shop Liability and Enhanced Overservice Law Enforcement Initiatives on Excessive Alcohol Consumption and Related Harms, 41 Am.
functionality, or overservice? What tangible and intangible needs of the company and its stakeholders have not been realized?
Servers and sellers may be trained to check identification and refuse service to minors, recognize signs of intoxication and avoid sales or service to people who are visibly intoxicated (known as overservice), and intervene to prevent impaired patrons from driving (Toomey et al, 1998).
At the same time, many of these firms overservice their clients; that is, they continuously add services to meet the needs of new clients, taxing their resources and decreasing the quality of their other services.
The licensing agency often has resources for training the employees of bars to prevent overservice and manage problems.
In the mid-1980s, research attention was drawn to the overservice problem by the proportion of arrested and crash-involved drinking drivers who had consumed their last drink at a bar, restaurant, or other licensed establishment.
Finally, some point out that experience suggests that for-profit clinics may be motivated to overservice patients--a charge that could be levelled with equal justice at hospitals and the physicians who staff them.
We "overservice" the people making complaints, because we want to give a Nordstrom's level of attention to our residents.
The fragmentation of the post service will result in irregular delivery; vast rural areas without delivery and without a post office; vast overservice of large towns and cities with salespeople calling businesses nearly every day to switch services; and a process of continued urban post office closure with ever greater queues.
Physician-directed quality assessment and improvement programs -- designed to detect practices of underservice or overservice and includes recommendation for credentialing practices.
However, many of the expert informants expressed concerns that underage drinking and the overservice of alcohol in public licensed establishments are common despite licensing laws to the contrary.