oversimple

o·ver·sim·ple

 (ō′vər-sĭm′pəl)
adj.
Too simple; not thoroughgoing: oversimple explanations of complex phenomena.

o′ver·sim′ply adv.

oversimple

(ˌəʊvəˈsɪmpəl) or

oversimplistic

adj
excessively simple
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
His book is too spirited and nuanced to hammer home an oversimple argument about the establishment and surveillance, but Phillips was no doubt interested in the recent news that an entire file on the Zinoviev Letter was accidentally and mysteriously "lost" by Home Office civil servants.
Such admissions, while easy to overlook in Whitman's fiction, are consistent enough to frustrate critical readings of his tales as being thematically oversimple, or merely reformist.
Generational cohort theory suggests that members of Generation Z will experience a childhood that is "oversimple, overslowed, [and] overprotected" (Strauss and Howe 1997, p.
Again, it is oversimple to say that Jefferson wrote as a democrat and lived like an aristocrat.
Let [section] f([g.sup.-1] (z))dz vanish oversimple closed contour in R [union] {0} through the origin.
On the one hand, a common basic carry mechanism of current information network, the function of TCP/IP, is oversimple, and it leads to a huge gap between the basic ability of network and the requirement of upper-layer application.
Brown's main claim was that modal logic was a useful tool for the analysis of ability, and that previous--unsuccessful--attempts to characterize ability in modal logic were based on an oversimple semantics.
This should protect us from the oversimple notion that the big turn did not come until the fourth century.
It is also oversimple, in my opinion, to say that the label neoconservative "clearly fit him." Both judgments seem, if I may say so, anachronistic.
Optimal physiological homeostasis, too--what Othello might recognize as a subjective feeling of contentment--indeed owes much to efficient cardiovascular function, but to say that the heart has regained its Galenic locus of human emotion would be oversimple. Instead our enduring appreciation of the heart as more than merely emotionally symbolic evolves out of a convergence of early experimental physiology with brain science (an oddly convoluted story, imminent in Otniel Dror's Blush, Adrenaline, Excitement: Modernity and the Study of Emotions, 1860-1940 [Chicago: University of Chicago Press, forthcoming]).
the sender/message/receiver model: this risk is the oversimple