overwash


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overwash

(ˌəʊvəˈwɒʃ)
n
(Physical Geography) geography the washing of sediment landward from the sea
References in periodicals archive ?
DON'T overwash your hair, shampoo no more often than every third day, and use baby shampoo, washing only once.
* Don't overwash your hair: Stay away from washing your hair everyday in winter.
Already we're getting some overwash, the ocean is coming over 12," she said, referring to the islands' main road.
The coastal impacts of the non-tidal contributions to Nu'a Kai described above (e.g., overwash and erosion of the famed Waikiki Beach) occurred during seasonally large astronomical high tides, which contributed another 7 and 16 cm above the average tidal range in April and August, respectively.
Approximately 15 percent of that same shoreline has a high probability of experiencing overwash, where surge and waves overtop dunes.
Homotrema rubrum (Lamark) taphonomy as an overwash indicator in Marine Ponds on Anegada, British Virgin Islands.
Even if the initial shoreline survived the transgression, the preserved stratigraphy should be dominated by landward transport of eroded sand by overwash and other inlet processes.
North Carolina was putting extra heavy equipment in place to remove sand and the overwash as soon as possible after Arthur passes.
The state was putting extra heavy equipment in place to remove sand and the overwash as soon as possible after the storm passes.
The surf zone ichthyoplankton adjacent to an intermittently open estuary, with evidence of recruitment during marine overwash events.
During big storms, there is some overwash, but for the most part the creeks are served by tidal water from the Indian River Lagoon.
observ.), posiblemente debido a que los troncos pueden ser movidos con facilidad durante los mares de leva (overwash), matando, asi, a los reclutas recientes.