overwithhold


Also found in: Financial.

o·ver·with·hold

 (ō′vər-wĭth-hōld′, -wĭth-)
v. o·ver·with·held (-hĕld′), o·ver·with·hold·ing, o·ver·with·holds
v.tr.
1. To deduct (an amount in withholding tax) beyond the tax owed.
2. To subject to overwithholding.
v.intr.
To deduct too much withholding tax.

overwithhold

(ˌəʊvəwɪðˈhəʊld)
vb
to deduct more (withholding tax) than is owed
References in periodicals archive ?
An indirect method of requiring returns is to overwithhold and require taxpayers to obtain refunds through the return filing process.
Schepanski and Shearer (1995) suggested that prospect theory can explain the phenomenon that individuals who underwithhold income taxes are more likely to engage in noncompliance than those who overwithhold.