ovipositor


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o·vi·pos·i·tor

 (ō′və-pŏz′ĭ-tər)
n.
1. A tubular structure, usually concealed but sometimes extending outside the abdomen, with which many female insects deposit eggs.
2. A similar organ of certain fishes and turtles.

ovipositor

(ˌəʊvɪˈpɒzɪtə)
n
1. (Zoology) the egg-laying organ of most female insects, consisting of a pair of specialized appendages at the end of the abdomen
2. (Zoology) a similar organ in certain female fishes, formed by an extension of the edges of the genital opening

o•vi•pos•i•tor

(ˌoʊ vəˈpɒz ɪ tər)

n.
1. an organ at the end of the abdomen in certain female insects, through which eggs are deposited.
2. a similar organ in other creatures.

o·vi·pos·i·tor

(ō′və-pŏz′ĭ-tər)
A tube in many female insects that extends from the end of the abdomen and is used to lay eggs.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ovipositor - egg-laying tubular structure at the end of the abdomen in many female insects and some fishesovipositor - egg-laying tubular structure at the end of the abdomen in many female insects and some fishes
organ - a fully differentiated structural and functional unit in an animal that is specialized for some particular function
Translations

ovipositor

nLegebohrer m, → Legestachel m
References in classic literature ?
But natural selection can and does often produce structures for the direct injury of other species, as we see in the fang of the adder, and in the ovipositor of the ichneumon, by which its eggs are deposited in the living bodies of other insects.
The diagnostic characters of the species are the enlarged dorsal-longitudinal ridges on the basal half of the ovipositor, and the setose sclerotized posterior margin of the male seventh tergite.
The ichneumon slides her long ovipositor into the hole and lays eggs inside the horntail larvae.
Most parasitoid wasps have a long organ called the ovipositor, which helps them place eggs into or on their prey.
The creature, thought to be widely spread across Australia, packs a long ovipositor or the needle-like structure which they use to inject the eggs into the host, which is a moth caterpillar for this one.
Ovipositor relative length: shorter than abdome (0) (Figure 23); longer than abdome (1) (Figures 24 and 25)
Interspecific variation in ovipositor morphology among manaosbiid and nomoclastid harvestmen (Arachnida, Opiliones, Laniatores).
Genera in this key are grouped by tribe, and some of these are based on the following structures: body size, pronotum, fastigium, cerci, subgenitalplate, and shape of ovipositor.
Pablo Vargas Lugo's recent exhibition "Ovipositor" surprisingly paralleled, whether intentionally or not, certain concepts integral to the poststructuralist thought of Jacques Derrida--dissemination and fertility, nakedness and its inescapable vulnerability, presupposed presence and factual appearance.
Diagnosis.--Species in this group are characterized by the more or less laterally compressed metasomal apex of females, with T4 - 7 always visible, and T1 nearly parallel sided; ovipositor and sheaths are relatively long and thick, with the sheaths rounded or lanceolate; antenna short with most flagellomeres only slightly longer than wide, antenna shorter than body, about as long as or shorter than forewing; forewing vein 1CUb more than 2 times longer than 1CUa, vein 1cua slightly inclivous, and vein M+CU more or less sinuate; hindwing with wing vein RS sinuate, marginal cell narrowest at middle, vein m-cu mostly present and interstitial to just antefurcal, vein M+CU a little longer than 1M; apex of hind tibia without modified comb of setae.