ovipositor

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o·vi·pos·i·tor

 (ō′və-pŏz′ĭ-tər)
n.
1. A tubular structure, usually concealed but sometimes extending outside the abdomen, with which many female insects deposit eggs.
2. A similar organ of certain fishes and turtles.

ovipositor

(ˌəʊvɪˈpɒzɪtə)
n
1. (Zoology) the egg-laying organ of most female insects, consisting of a pair of specialized appendages at the end of the abdomen
2. (Zoology) a similar organ in certain female fishes, formed by an extension of the edges of the genital opening

o•vi•pos•i•tor

(ˌoʊ vəˈpɒz ɪ tər)

n.
1. an organ at the end of the abdomen in certain female insects, through which eggs are deposited.
2. a similar organ in other creatures.

o·vi·pos·i·tor

(ō′və-pŏz′ĭ-tər)
A tube in many female insects that extends from the end of the abdomen and is used to lay eggs.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ovipositor - egg-laying tubular structure at the end of the abdomen in many female insects and some fishesovipositor - egg-laying tubular structure at the end of the abdomen in many female insects and some fishes
organ - a fully differentiated structural and functional unit in an animal that is specialized for some particular function
Translations

ovipositor

nLegebohrer m, → Legestachel m
References in classic literature ?
But natural selection can and does often produce structures for the direct injury of other species, as we see in the fang of the adder, and in the ovipositor of the ichneumon, by which its eggs are deposited in the living bodies of other insects.
Females spent significantly more time probing with their ovipositors on infested than intact uninfested cabbage hosts, followed by antennal rotation and flying/walking.
Note: This elongate condition, while the norm for species of the acrobaptus group, is exceptional within the dubius group where ovipositors are generally much shorter.
They are much different from the also highly modified but still understandable plate-shaped ovipositors as described in Phaenacantha (Anorygma) and Symphylax by Stys (1974, 1977, respectively).
One hypothesis to explain these low fecundity rates concerns the relative lengths of their ovipositors (see below).
All other dragonfly females are "exophytic," and have ovipositors that lack saw-like edges.
In contrast, the bumblebee's ovipositors remain intact, and a single bee may sting multiple times.
In the subfamily Eumolpinae the females have telescoping ovipositors through which the male endophalli pass, reaching to or near the mouth of the spermathecal duct.