owl


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owl

 (oul)
n.
1. Any of various often nocturnal birds of prey of the order Strigiformes, having hooked and feathered talons, a large head with a short hooked beak, large eyes set forward, and fluffy plumage that allows for almost noiseless flight.
2. Any of several breeds of domestic pigeons having a very short beak somewhat like that of an owl and often a frill of feathers on the chest.

[Middle English owle, from Old English ūle, of imitative origin.]

owl

(aʊl)
n
1. (Animals) any nocturnal bird of prey of the order Strigiformes, having large front-facing eyes, a small hooked bill, soft feathers, and a short neck
2. (Breeds) any of various breeds of owl-like fancy domestic pigeon (esp the African owl, Chinese owl, and English owl)
3. a person who looks or behaves like an owl, esp in having a solemn manner
[Old English ūle; related to Dutch uil, Old High German ūwila, Old Norse ugla]
ˈowl-ˌlike adj

owl

(aʊl)

n.
1. any of numerous chiefly nocturnal birds of prey comprising the order Strigiformes, having a broad head with large, forward-directed eyes that are usu. surrounded by disks of modified feathers.
3. a person of owllike solemnity or appearance.
[before 900; Middle English oule, Old English ūle, c. Middle Low German, Middle Dutch ūle, Old Norse ugla; akin to Old High German ūwila (German Eule)]

owl

(oul)
Any of various birds of prey that are usually active at night and have a large head, large forward-facing eyes, a short hooked bill, and a flat round face.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.owl - nocturnal bird of prey with hawk-like beak and claws and large head with front-facing eyesowl - nocturnal bird of prey with hawk-like beak and claws and large head with front-facing eyes
bird of prey, raptor, raptorial bird - any of numerous carnivorous birds that hunt and kill other animals
owlet - young owl
Athene noctua, little owl - small European owl
horned owl - large owls having prominent ear tufts
great gray owl, great grey owl, Strix nebulosa - large dish-faced owl of northern North America and western Eurasia
Strix aluco, tawny owl - reddish-brown European owl having a round head with black eyes
barred owl, Strix varia - large owl of eastern North America having its breast and abdomen streaked with brown
Otus asio, screech owl - small North American owl having hornlike tufts of feathers whose call sounds like a quavering whistle
screech owl - any owl that has a screeching cry
scops owl - any of several small owls having ear tufts and a whistling call
spotted owl, Strix occidentalis - a large owl of North America found in forests from British Columbia to central Mexico; has dark brown plumage and a heavily spotted chest
hoot owl - any owl that hoots as distinct from screeching
hawk owl, Surnia ulula - grey-and-white diurnal hawk-like owl of northern parts of the northern hemisphere
Asio otus, long-eared owl - slender European owl of coniferous forests with long ear tufts
laughing owl, Sceloglaux albifacies, laughing jackass - almost extinct owl of New Zealand
barn owl, Tyto alba - mottled buff and white owl often inhabiting barns and other structures; important in rodent control

owl

noun
Related words
young owlet
collective noun parliament
Translations
بُومَةٌبومَه
sova
ugle
بوفجغد
pöllö
उल्लू
sova
bagoly
burung hantu
ugla
フクロウ
올빼미
pelėda
pūce
bufniţă
sovavýr
sova
buljinajejajejinasovaсова
ugglauv
นกเค้าแมว
сова
con cú

owl

[aʊl] N (= barn owl) → lechuza f; (= little owl) → mochuelo m; (= long-eared owl) → búho m; (= tawny owl) → cárabo m

owl

[ˈaʊl] nchouette f

owl

nEule f; wise old owlweise Eule

owl

[aʊl] n (small) → civetta; (big) → gufo
little owl → civetta notturna
long-eared owl → gufo comune
short-eared owl → gufo di palude

owl

(aul) noun
a type of bird that flies at night and feeds on small birds and animals.

owl

بُومَةٌ sova ugle Eule κουκουβάγια búho pöllö chouette sova civetta フクロウ 올빼미 uil ugle sowa coruja сова uggla นกเค้าแมว baykuş con cú 猫头鹰
References in classic literature ?
It stood close to the roadside and over the door was a sign that read: "Miss Foolish Owl and Mr.
The Grasshopper refused to desist, and chirped louder and louder the more the Owl entreated.
He bore a huge club in his hand and his round owl eyes blinked fiercely upon the intruder.
The gentleman owl says [[musical notes occur here in the printed text]], and she answers from her tree a little way off,[[musical notes]], beautifully assenting to and completing her lord's remark, as becomes a properly constructed German she-owl.
One after another the doctors came, a Crow, and Owl, and a Talking Cricket.
They have reached the Owl Creek bridge, put it in order and built a stockade on the north bank.
All the day long she flew about in the form of an owl, or crept about the country like a cat; but at night she always became an old woman again.
Far through unfrequented woods on the confines of towns, where once only the hunter penetrated by day, in the darkest night dart these bright saloons without the knowledge of their inhabitants; this moment stopping at some brilliant station-house in town or city, where a social crowd is gathered, the next in the Dismal Swamp, scaring the owl and fox.
However, he said that the sound proceeded from a very large owl, in a hollow tree; a sort of learned owl, that continually knocked its head against the branches.
And the owl, Too-Too, who was good at arithmetic, figured it out that there was only money enough left to last another week-- if they each had one meal a day and no more.
I passed by his garden, and marked, with one eye, How the Owl and the Panther were sharing a pie--'
Up the broad flight of shallow steps, Monsieur the Marquis, flambeau preceded, went from his carriage, sufficiently disturbing the darkness to elicit loud remonstrance from an owl in the roof of the great pile of stable building away among the trees.