oxlip


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ox·lip

 (ŏks′lĭp′)
n.
A Eurasian primrose (Primula elatior) having yellow flowers clustered in a one-sided umbel.

[Middle English oxeslippe, from Old English oxanslyppe : oxan, genitive sing. of oxa, ox + slyppe, slimy substance; see sleubh- in Indo-European roots.]

oxlip

(ˈɒksˌlɪp)
n
1. (Plants) Also called: paigle a primulaceous Eurasian woodland plant, Primula elatior, with small drooping pale yellow flowers
2. (Plants) Also called: false oxlip a similar and related plant that is a natural hybrid between the cowslip and primrose
[Old English oxanslyppe, literally: ox's slippery dropping; see slip3, compare cowslip]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oxlip - Eurasian primrose with yellow flowers clustered in a one-sided umbel
primrose, primula - any of numerous short-stemmed plants of the genus Primula having tufted basal leaves and showy flowers clustered in umbels or heads
Translations
prvosenka vyšší

oxlip

[ˈɒkslɪp] Nprímula f

oxlip

n (Bot) → hohe or weiße Schlüsselblume
References in periodicals archive ?
In this country alone, the lady's-slipper orchid now only exists in the wild in one location in Northamptonshire and the beautiful and rare oxlip can only be found wild in five woods in East Anglia.
1 I 2 SKIING 4 IVY 5 VAN 6 VIE 7 SILVIINE 9 SIX 10 OX 11 AXIS 12 TAXIING 14 REFLEXIVE 15 SEXVALENT 19 MAXIXE 40 AXLE 41 OXLIP 50 LA 51 LIE 52 NAUPLII 54 LIVE 55 SOLVE 56 PELVIC 57 SYLVIINE 59 HELIX 60 CALX 90 EXCEL 91 EXCITE 100 CAB 101 ACID 104 CIVET 150 CLAN 151 CLIP 154 PROCLIVITY 200 OCCUR 201 ACCIDENT 204 BACCIVOROUS 250 ACCLAIM 251 ACCLIMATISE 254 ACCLIVITY 500 DO 501 DIE 502 RADII 504 DIVE 505 ADVENT 506 ADVICE 509 RADIX 550 IDLE 551 IDLING 600 MADCAP 650 HEADCLOTH 900 ACME 901 ACMITE 1000 ME 1001 MINE 1002 GASTROCNEMII 1004 SEMIVOWEL 1005 DUUMVIR 1006 TRIUMVIR 1009 MIX 1050 DIMLY 1051 GREMLIN 1100 ARMCHAIR 1500 HUMDRUM 1501 HUMDINGER 2000 DUMMY 2001 COMMIT 2009 COMMIXTURE 2050 BUMMLE 2051 BUMMLING
A lifetime of pursuing primroses, oxlips, and samphire has led Mabey to a particular feeling about plants: that they're not merely decorative or passive, the victims of exploitation or fashion, like unfortunate Victorian ferns.