oxygen debt


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oxygen debt

n.
The amount of extra oxygen required by muscle tissue during recovery from vigorous exercise.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ox′ygen debt`



n.
the body's oxygen deficiency resulting from strenuous physical activity.
[1920–25]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oxygen debt - a cumulative deficit of oxygen resulting from intense exercise; the deficit must be made up when the body returns to rest
physical condition, physiological condition, physiological state - the condition or state of the body or bodily functions
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References in periodicals archive ?
He said she should be cognizant of the fact that an appropriate race rhythm was vital for the total racing distance, success as well as avoiding oxygen debt on the second half, or second 200m of 400m race, and further manage and stick to her usual race strategies and put more effort.
It is the end product of anaerobic metabolism and thus is commonly used as an indicator for oxygen debt. Lactic acid serves as a marker of mortality risk and a target for therapy [1, 2].
"You want to run out of breath and be in oxygen debt," Aliotti said.
"You're in oxygen debt and I had to really push past that pain and see if I could get in.
We draw attention: the concept of EPOC (Excess Postexercise Oxygen Consumption) states that any effort starts and ends with an oxygen debt (O2D max); it results that, for mobilizing the body to reach maximal oxygen consumption, at least 3 minutes must elapse, depending on the length of the event.
A persistently normal ScvO [sub]2 and decreasing serum lactate concentration normally reflects a resolving oxygen deficit, and that any oxygen debt is being repaid.
The oxygen debt ([O.sub.2debt]) as the volume of oxygen consumed above basal values for the first 30 s after each repetition was also assessed (Otsuki et al., 2007).
The possible mechanisms of contracting and paying the oxygen debt and the role of lactic acid in muscular contraction.
Evidence generated from studies conducted in large animal species (dog, pig, and humans) has identified oxygen debt and tissue oxygen-tension (tP[O.sub.2]) values that are predictive of both a therapeutic time window and the fluid replacement volume required to prevent irreversible shock [3, 5, 6].
One explanation for this finding may be that the longer the mussels spent closed, the greater the oxygen debt they incurred while closed, and the greater the subsequent metabolic rate when they opened, due to the need to repay their oxygen debt.