oxytocin


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Related to oxytocin: Oxycontin, Pitocin

ox·y·to·cin

 (ŏk′sĭ-tō′sĭn)
n.
1. A short polypeptide hormone, C43H66N12O12S2, released from the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland, that stimulates the contraction of smooth muscle of the uterus during labor and facilitates ejection of milk from the breast during nursing.
2. A synthetic form of this hormone, used as a drug to induce labor and to control postpartum hemorrhage.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

oxytocin

(ˌɒksɪˈtəʊsɪn)
n
(Biochemistry) a polypeptide hormone, secreted by the pituitary gland, that stimulates contractions of the uterus or oviduct and ejection of milk in mammals; alphahypophame: used therapeutically for aiding childbirth. Formula: C43H68N12O12S2. Compare vasopressin
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ox•y•to•cin

(ˌɒk sɪˈtoʊ sən)

n.
a pituitary hormone that stimulates contraction of the smooth muscles of the uterus to induce labor.
[1925–30]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oxytocin - hormone secreted by the posterior pituitary gland (trade name Pitocin); stimulates contractions of the uterus and ejection of milk
endocrine, hormone, internal secretion - the secretion of an endocrine gland that is transmitted by the blood to the tissue on which it has a specific effect
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

ox·y·to·cin

n. oxitocina, ocitocina, hormona pituitaria que estimula las contracciones del útero.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

oxytocin

n oxitocina
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The oxytocin receptor cells are present in the brain area and are thought to be involved in the regulation of maternal behavior.
Paul Zak, the author of the book Trust Factor: The Science of Creating High-Performance Companies, suggested various ways to increase the levels of oxytocin in the human body.
(1,2) Medications reported to reduce postpartum bleeding include oxytocin, misoprostol, ergonovine, methylergonovine, carboprost, and tranexamic acid.
A research team from the Kinsey Institute, Indiana University, the University of Virginia and Northeastern University recently discovered that a single exposure to oxytocin near the time of birth can have effects in the offspring, including increases in social behaviors that may persist into adulthood.
In the end, they concluded that those who received a dose of oxytocin had a weakened desire to eat when they were shown photos of high-calorie foods.
Cligosiban acts on oxytocin cells in the brain and spinal cord to reduce blood levels of the hormone.
They were anticipating, she explains, that "couples playing the board games would interact more because they were communicating about the games and strategies, or because they were competing, and with more interaction, they would release more oxytocin." She and her colleagues believe that their study is the first to investigate how different types of recreational activity might impact levels of oxytocin.
Patients were divided into two groups (n=45), group-A received oxytocin (5 IU) approximately over 10 seconds as an intravenous bolus and group-B received (5 IU) over 5 minutes as an infusion in infusion pump.
Oxytocin is a nine-amino acid peptide that normally is produced in the hypothalamus and secreted by the posterior pituitary in a spurting or pulsatile fashion.
Examination of the pharmacology of oxytocin and clinical guidelines for use in labor.
Mariana Widmer, from the World Health Organization in Geneva, and colleagues enrolled women across 23 sites in 10 countries in a non-inferiority trial comparing intramuscular injections of heat-stable carbetocin with oxytocin administered immediately after vaginal birth.