oxytone

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ox·y·tone

 (ŏk′sĭ-tōn′)
adj.
1. Relating to or being a Greek word that has an acute accent on its last syllable.
2. Relating to or being a word that has a heavy stress accent on its last syllable.
n.
A word having the stress or the acute accent on the last syllable.

[Greek oxutonos : oxus, sharp; see ak- in Indo-European roots + tonos, tone; see tone.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

oxytone

(ˈɒksɪˌtəʊn)
adj
(Phonetics & Phonology) (of a word) having an accent on the final syllable
n
(Phonetics & Phonology) an oxytone word
[C18: from Greek oxytonos, from oxus sharp + tonos tone]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ox•y•tone

(ˈɒk sɪˌtoʊn)
adj.
1. (of a word in Classical Greek) having an acute accent on the last syllable.
n.
2. an oxytone word.
[1755–65; < Greek oxýtonos sharp-toned. See oxy-1, tone]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oxytone - word having stress or an acute accent on the last syllable
word - a unit of language that native speakers can identify; "words are the blocks from which sentences are made"; "he hardly said ten words all morning"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
An interesting aspect that emerges upon analyzing our results--see figure 4--is that there is an inverse correlation between presence and level in the case of oxytones, and a direct correlation in the case of paroxytones and proparoxytones.
(4) A very well-known pronunciation rule establishes, for example, that a stressed unigraph in an oxytone structure followed by a single consonant and closed by a silent <e> is to be pronounced with the long version of that particular unigraph (Venezky 1970, 104; Bozman 1988, 13).
Those who connected mene, tene and sene with the verbs and other lexical classes containing the augment syllable -ne, saw the connection in the fact that all the relevant forms were vowel-final oxytones. The specific forms discussed in this context included verbs like fane 'fa', vane 'va', puone 'puo' and saline 'sali', found already in Dante (Parodi, 116); and central and southern Italo-Romance verbs, adverbs, nouns, numerals and non-personal pronouns like piune 'piu', dine 'di', none 'non', quine 'qui', purcene 'perche', piene 'pie', trene 'tre', cosine 'cosi' and pensone 'penso' (more examples are cited in Rohlfs, Grammatica, 468-469).
After the reanalysis would have been complete, the final syllable of mini could have been extended to other vowel-final oxytones as a marker of emphasis, essentially following the scenarios proposed by MeyerLubke, Pieri, Grandgent, and others, for alternative starting forms.
(5.) Here and in what follows, I use a simplified IPA transcription, with s c g instead of [??] t[??] dz, CC instead of C:, and V instead of V (stress is marked only on oxytones and proparoxytones).
Marotta starts in an orthodox prosodic framework but her faith quickly disintegrates into methodological doubt: about the 'degeneration' of oxytones, the wisdom of negating iambic words, ternary feet, and even monosyllabic feet.
The initial statement (70--72) is simple and matter-of-fact, introducing the two basic forms of the word, the noun and the verb ('volonta [...] che fa volerne'); but its exceptional concentration of three oxytones in two lines -- 'volonta quieta/virtu di carita' -- gives the lines a staccato rhythm such as Dante would normally avoid, hinting at a tension still present heneath the surface, as if at this point peaceful submission was being asserted but was not yet fully achieved.
In order to find out the phonological units that better account for the rising F0 trajectories in the two languages, I recorded one English and one Spanish native speaker producing 45 declarative sentences which contained words with different stress distributions (oxytones, paroxytones and proparoxytones) in prenuclear position.
In order to find out the phonological primes that account for prenuclear F0 rises, recordings were made of one English and one Spanish native speaker producing 45 declarative sentences which contained words with different stress distribution in prenuclear position: oxytones (words with stress on the final syllable and thus no postaccentual syllables within the word), paroxytones (words with stress on the penultimante syllable and thus one postaccentual syllable within the word) and proparoxytones (words with stress on the antepenultimate syllable and thus two postaccentual syllables within the word).
The status of L is investigated in words with different stress distributions (oxytones, paroxytones, and proparoxytones) in subject and verb focal positions.
In order to determine the status of L after the focal element in the two languages, focal words with different stress distributions were used, namely, oxytones (words with stress on the ultimate syllable), paroxytones (words with stress on the penultimate syllable), and proparoxytones (words with stress on the antepenultimate syllable).
The "thematic" type, on the other hand, seems to have originally been oxytone, the exceptions being two instances, usinarani- and purukutsani-, where the derivative imitates the accent of its basis, and one further case, mudgalani-, (15) where the accent is paroxytone just as in the "athematics."