pinworm

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Related to oxyurid: hypophrenic, periarterial

pin·worm

 (pĭn′wûrm′)
n.
Any of various small nematode worms of the order Oxyurida that are parasitic in vertebrates and certain invertebrates, especially Enterobius vermicularis, a species that infests the human intestines. Also called threadworm.

pinworm

(ˈpɪnˌwɜːm)
n
(Animals) a parasitic nematode worm, Enterobius vermicularis, infecting the colon, rectum, and anus of humans: family Oxyuridae. Also called: threadworm

pin•worm

(ˈpɪnˌwɜrm)

n.
a small nematode worm, Enterobius vermicularis, infesting the intestine and migrating to the anus, esp. in children.
[1905–10]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pinworm - small threadlike worm infesting human intestines and rectum especially in childrenpinworm - small threadlike worm infesting human intestines and rectum especially in children
nematode, nematode worm, roundworm - unsegmented worms with elongated rounded body pointed at both ends; mostly free-living but some are parasitic
Translations

pinworm

n oxiuro, pequeña lombriz blanca que afecta en particular a los niños
References in periodicals archive ?
Morphologically similar larvae were collected from the viscera washing of 5 of the 6 frogs; these larvae were identified as pinworms, based on morphologic characteristics and comparison to larvae released by a female oxyurid collected from the gut.
Ten helminth parasite species have been formally described from these two host species, including anoplocephalid tapeworms of the genus Schizorchis Hansen, 1948, oxyurid nematodes of the genus Cephaluris Akhtar, 1947 and subgenera Labiostomum (Labiostomum) Akhtar, 1941 and Labiostomum (Eugenuris) (Schultz, 1948), and strongylid nematodes of the genera Graphidiella Olsen, 1948, Murielus Dikmans, 1939, and Ohbayashinema Durette-Desset, 1974.
In the case of some thelastomatid and oxyurid pinworms known as obligate phoretics or parasites from the hindguts of terrestrial arthropods, especially those potentially involved in the pet trade such as the Madagascar hissing cockroach, Gromphadorhina portentosa (Schaum), and some Blaberus species close to B.