oysterbed

Translations

oysterbed

[ˈɔɪstəbed] Ncriadero m de ostras, vivero m de ostras
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Oysterbed Pier is only two kilometers away from the picturesque coastal village of Sneem and is a quiet and peaceful area.
Mr Wyse already has a holiday home in the area at Oysterbed Pier, a short distance from Clashnacree House.
It is a coastal and marine wetland that has coral reefs, mangroves, shallow lagoons, seagrass beds, oysterbeds, and sandy shorelines that is home to more than 500 marine species such as the critically endangered hawksbill turtle, the endangered mottled eagle ray, and green turtle.
In Rash's novel, an inhabited Appalachian valley is flooded by the damming of several rivers to form a lake for a hydroelectric plant; in Biguenet's, South Louisiana oysterbeds inexorably decline following the construction of canals through wetlands for oil and gas extraction.
(21) Local fisherman James Putwain was appointed Inspector of Fisheries and Oysterbeds to study the local fisheries and make recommendations for appropriate protective measures.
It is concerned about the impact the waste could have on the environment, including Mersea oysterbeds, and also those who use Bradwell Marina who BANNG say could be sailing or swimming in nuclear debris.
His subject matter encompassed Pop compositions, Meat and Salad paintings, semi-abstract depictions of Liverpool FC's Kop, pastoral English hedges, and foreign locations - a luxuriant Hollywood hillside, the red-rose city of Petra, eerie oysterbeds in Brittany or the Postman Ferdinand Cheval's extraordinary folly in Hauterives.
Apparently, it also has incredible cosmetic properties and is a product of all the precipitation through the oysterbeds. We're told to smear some on our faces, and, conscious that no one's going to see us down here, we oblige.
Muir quotes the State of New York Conservation Commission's 1922 "Studies in Oyster Culture," which pointed the finger at "the requirements of commerce [which] have caused these streams to be lined with bulkheads, dredged to considerable depths and the towns and industries which have grown up around them [thus] pollut[ing] the waters of the harbors." The Connecticut oyster industry died in the 1950s and '60s, just as the Massachusetts and Long Island Sound oysterbeds had earlier died, which, Muir explains, was why "the house where I spent my childhood summers was available for us to rent...