ozone hole

(redirected from ozone holes)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to ozone holes: Montreal Protocol

ozone hole

n.
A large area of the ozone layer over Antarctica that annually becomes depleted of ozone by the action of chlorofluorocarbons and other pollutants.

o′zone hole`


n.
any part of the ozone layer that has become depleted by atmospheric pollution, resulting in excess ultraviolet radiation passing through the atmosphere.
[1985–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ozone hole - an area of the ozone layer (near the poles) that is seasonally depleted of ozone
hole - an opening into or through something
ozone layer, ozonosphere - a layer in the stratosphere (at approximately 20 miles) that contains a concentration of ozone sufficient to block most ultraviolet radiation from the sun
Translations
ózonlyuk
References in periodicals archive ?
"But we may continue to see large Antarctic ozone holes until about 2025 because of weather conditions in the stratosphere and because ozone depleting chemicals linger in the atmosphere for several decades after they have been phased out."
"These record-setting levels were not measured in Antarctica, where ozone holes have been a recurring problem for decades," says team leader Nathalie A.
Paul Newman, an atmospheric scientist and ozone expert at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md, said that there was a lot of Antarctic ozone depletion in 2013, but because of above average temperatures in the Antarctic lower stratosphere, the ozone hole was a bit below average compared to ozone holes observed since 1990.
"We will for the next couple of decades expect to see recurring ozone holes of the size that we see now," he said.
Had we lived long enough we would realise ozone holes come and go and that climatic change is more affected by sun spots than anything we do.
"Ozone holes should be smaller by the time today's teens are in their mid to late 20s," says scientist Craig Long of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
However, replacing them with hydrogen gas--considered to be a clean-burning source of energy--may generate a different set of environmental problems, including large and long-lasting ozone holes, according to a new analysis.
After all, ozone holes appear at high latitudes during winter, when people are less inclined to sunbathe.
Asked if the decrease in the ozone layer could be the worst since ozone holes were first detected over Antarctica in the 1970s, Al-Ghanem said ''yes.''
Set to rollicking blues, calypso and folk melodies, and backed by a children's chorus, Vermont schoolteacher Kallis takes young listeners on a guided tour of today's issues, from recycling to acid rain and ozone holes. The CD booklet contains tips for singing with children (they have high voices and narrow ranges, so watch your pitch!) and notes on homemade instruments, from the washtub bass to the rainstick.
"Ozone holes could soon open over heavily populated regions in the northern hemisphere as well as the southern," Time magazine wailed in February 1992.
Under the right conditions--a massive volcanic eruption, an unusually heavy concentration of stratospheric clouds during the Arctic winter, a slight increase in the amount of CFCs, etc.--nonstandard chemistry might suddenly kick in at warmer latitudes and produce ozone holes over inhabited regions.