p53


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p53

 (pē′fĭf′tē-thrē′)
n.
1. A protein that regulates normal cell growth and proliferation and prevents unrestrained division of cells whose DNA has been damaged, as from ultraviolet or ionizing radiation. The absence of functional p53, usually resulting from a genetic mutation, increases the risk of developing various cancers.
2. The tumor suppressor gene that codes for this protein. Also called TP53.

[p(rotein) 53, from its apparent molecular mass of 53 kilodaltons as extrapolated from its mobility during electrophoresis.]
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References in periodicals archive ?
The findings explain p53's involvement in a molecular process specific to females called 'X chromosome inactivation'.
The tumor suppressor p53 has critical checkpoint functions that sense DNA damage and inappropriate growth signals, and p53 is capable of transcriptionally activating a series of genes involved in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.
Search for a description of "p53" and it becomes clear that this human protein is widely known for its cancer-fighting benefits, leading to its renown as "the guardian of the genome."
'yun pala sa pag recheck nung mga nai-print na proyekto, P53 billion pala dyan hindi nila kailangan o hindi nila hinihingi.
The regulatory mechanism associated with p53 was also confirmed to enrich the experimental evidence for oridonin as a tumor suppressor in GC.
The p53 gene was involved in numerous pathways, which were interlinked for progression of CaP.
This is the peso's lowest level since it ended at P53.985 versus the dollar on Dec.
"By picking cells that have successfully repaired the damaged gene we intended to fix, we might inadvertently also pick cells without functional p53," says Dr.
The secondary biomarker p53 has been studied at various centers in the world and has been found to be deregulated in cervical cancers.
"Many publications have used immortalized cells as MSC surrogates, but they may not mean much if they don't have functionally accurate p53," said Siddaraju Boregowda, one of the study's two lead authors.