pabulum


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pab·u·lum

 (păb′yə-ləm)
n.
1. A substance that gives nourishment; food.
2. Intellectual material that is bland, trite, or insipid; pablum: "TV ... gobbled up comedy material and spat it out as pabulum" (Richard Corliss).

[Latin pābulum; see pā- in Indo-European roots. Sense 2, by confusion with pablum.]

pabulum

(ˈpæbjʊləm)
n
1. food
2. food for thought, esp when bland or dull
[C17: from Latin, from pascere to feed]

pab•u•lum

(ˈpæb yə ləm)

n.
1. something that nourishes; food.
2. intellectual nourishment.
3. a soft, bland cereal for infants.
[1670–80; < Latin pābulum food, nourishment =pā(scere) to feed + -bulum n. suffix of instrument]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pabulum - any substance that can be used as foodpabulum - any substance that can be used as food
food, nutrient - any substance that can be metabolized by an animal to give energy and build tissue
tuck - eatables (especially sweets)
2.pabulum - insipid intellectual nourishment
food for thought, intellectual nourishment, food - anything that provides mental stimulus for thinking

pabulum

noun
2. That which sustains the mind or spirit:
Translations

pab·u·lum

n. L. pabulum, alimento o sustancia alimenticia mezcla de trigo y avena.
References in classic literature ?
His pabulum was an unquenchable belief in the Unerring Artistic Adjustment of Nature.
Even more, we have seen amongst us that he can even grow younger, that his vital faculties grow strenuous, and seem as though they refresh themselves when his special pabulum is plenty.
The first report came in a vacuous article in The New Yorker's Talk of the Town, which crowed about smart London dinner parties and Julius's cresting celebrity the was Princess Diana's matrimonial attorney at the time) and congratulated him, with a jaunty approval usually bestowed on strong wrestlers or winning ponies, for having "erected barriers across every route down which critics have attempted to smuggle [Eliot's] good name." This pabulum was followed shortly thereafter by serious and approving reviews from Louis Menand in The New York Review of Books and Michiko Kakutani in the New York Times.
If you appear to be corporate pabulum, your reader will immediately do one of two things: one, toss you, unread; two, skim you with a jaundiced eye, expecting the worst.
Speech codes, politically correct usage, non-offensive pabulum are all, in my view, wounds to our mother tongue.
The prepackaged, commercial laden pabulum that passed for coverage of the Olympics, with its daily centerpiece the catfight between Tonya and Nancy, eclipsed all but the most hideous and dramatic news stories.
To cover up her geeky command of policy, Hillary settled on "pabulum political talk" and made "vanilla remarks", as if maternally feeding pap to the voters.
The rest of the interview is non-committal pabulum.
It presents a flickering, stammering vision that simultaneously refuses the pabulum and bondage of narrative and opens onto an unbounded space for reverie.
In his day, Dawson's works sold in the hundreds of thousands, and they were serious books for serious people, not the kind of pabulum that is popular today.
Just the latest environmental pabulum from the trendy religious left?