pacing


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Related to pacing: Cardiac pacing

pace 1

 (pās)
n.
1. A step made in walking; a stride.
2. A unit of length equal to 30 inches (0.76 meter).
3. The distance spanned by a step or stride, especially:
a. The modern version of the Roman pace, measuring five English feet. Also called geometric pace.
b. Thirty inches at quick marching time or 36 at double time.
c. Five Roman feet or 58.1 English inches, measured from the point at which the heel of one foot is raised to the point at which it is set down again after an intervening step by the other foot.
4.
a. The rate of speed at which a person, animal, or group walks or runs.
b. The rate of speed at which an activity or movement proceeds.
5. A manner of walking or running: a jaunty pace.
6. A gait of a horse in which both feet on one side are lifted and put down together.
v. paced, pac·ing, pac·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To walk or stride back and forth across: paced the floor nervously.
b. To measure (a space) by counting the number of steps needed to cover a distance.
c. To walk (a number of steps) in so measuring a space.
2. Sports
a. To set or regulate the rate of speed for (a race or a competitor in a race).
b. To lead (one's team or teammates) with a good performance: paced her team to a victory with 18 points.
3. To advance or develop (something) for a particular purpose or at a particular rate: paced the lectures so as not to overwhelm the students.
4. To train (a horse) in a particular gait, especially the pace.
v.intr.
1. To walk with long deliberate steps.
2. To go at the pace. Used of a horse or rider.
Idiom:
pace (oneself)
To move or make progress at a sensible or moderate rate.

[Middle English, from Old French pas, from Latin passus, from past participle of pandere, to stretch, spread out; see petə- in Indo-European roots.]

pa·ce 2

 (pä′chā, -kā, pā′sē)
prep.
With the permission of; with deference to. Used to express polite or ironically polite disagreement: I have not, pace my detractors, entered into any secret negotiations.

[Latin pāce, ablative of pāx, peace; see pag- in Indo-European roots.]

pa′ce adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pacing - (music) the speed at which a composition is to be played
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
musical time - (music) the beat of musical rhythm
accelerando - a gradually increasing tempo of music; "my ear will not accept such violent accelerandos"
allegretto - a quicker tempo than andante but not as fast as allegro
allegro - a brisk and lively tempo
andante - a moderately slow tempo (a walking pace)
meno mosso - played at reduced speed; less rapid
rubato - a flexible tempo; not strictly on the beat
2.pacing - walking with slow regular stridespacing - walking with slow regular strides  
gait - a person's manner of walking
References in classic literature ?
After pacing to and fro in much agitation, he struck his forehead, and burst out in a wild strain, singing of his hatred to Roderigo, his love for Zara, and his pleasing resolution to kill the one and win the other.
As I passed the Methodist Church, I saw three white figures ahead of me, pacing up and down under the arching maple trees, where the moonlight filtered through the lush June foliage.
Accident, or one of those unaccountable freaks which nature sometimes plays in the animal world, gave rise to a breed of horses which were once well known in America, and distinguished by their habit of pacing.
But if she were a long while absent he became pettish and nervously restless, pacing the room to and fro with the uncertainty that characterized all his movements; or else would sit broodingly in his great chair, resting his head on his hands, and evincing life only by an electric sparkle of ill-humor, whenever Hepzibah endeavored to arouse him.
And here, some six months ago -- pacing from corner to corner, or lounging on the long-legged tool, with his elbow on the desk, and his eyes wandering up and down the columns of the morning newspaper -- you might have recognised, honoured reader, the same individual who welcomed you into his cheery little study, where the sunshine glimmered so pleasantly through the willow branches on the western side of the Old Manse.
Nay, his busy fancy already realized his hopes, and presented to him the blooming Katrina, with a whole family of children, mounted on the top of a wagon loaded with household trumpery, with pots and kettles dangling beneath; and he beheld himself bestriding a pacing mare, with a colt at her heels, setting out for Kentucky, Tennessee, --or the Lord knows where!
here come more crowds, pacing straight for the water, and seemingly bound for a dive.
Unobserved he rose and glided away; while, awestruck by the aspect of their commander, the seamen clustered together on the forecastle, till Ahab, troubledly pacing the deck, shouted out -- To the braces
After that there was nothing for him to do but wait, pacing back and forth in the snow, meantime, to keep from freezing.
Frank Churchill and Miss Woodhouse dancedfor doing that in which she need not blush to compare herself with Jane Fairfaxand even for simple dancing itself, without any of the wicked aids of vanityto assist him first in pacing out the room they were in to see what it could be made to holdand then in taking the dimensions of the other parlour, in the hope of discovering, in spite of all that Mr.
A negotiation was opened through the medium of the ambassador, Sam; and after much pacing to and fro, till, I think, the said Sam's calves must have ached with the exercise, permission was at last, with great difficulty, extorted from the rigorous Sibyl, for the three to wait upon her in a body.
I bid them be quiet, now that they saw me returned, and, benumbed to my very heart, I dragged up-stairs; whence, after putting on dry clothes, and pacing to and fro thirty or forty minutes, to restore the animal heat, I adjourned to my study, feeble as a kitten: almost too much so to enjoy the cheerful fire and smoking coffee which the servant had prepared for my refreshment.