pack-year


Also found in: Medical, Wikipedia.

pack-year

n
(Medicine) a measure of the amount of cigarettes a person has smoked over an extended period, equal to one packet of 20 every day for one year
References in periodicals archive ?
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will cover the exam for individuals age 55-77 years with a 30 pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years (one pack-year = smoking one pack per day for one year; 1 pack = 20 cigarettes).
A 30 pack-year history would result, for example, from smoking a pack a day for 30 years, or two packs a day for 15 years, or half a pack a day for 60 years.
2013, the United States Preventive Services TaskForce (USPSTF) recommended screening of adults aged 55 to 80 years who have a 30 pack-year smoking history andcurrently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years.
Cumulative lifetime dose of smoking was assessed by pack-years (a pack-year was defined as having smoked 20 cigarettes per day for 1 year).
A pack-year is a measure defined as smoking 20 cigarettes a day for a year or any equivalent, such as two packs a day for six months.
Cumulative tobacco consumption was calculated for former and current smokers in pack-years; a pack-year was defined as 20 g of tobacco per day for a year.
To qualify for the screening program, patients must be 55 to 74 years old, and either an active smoker with at least a 30 pack-year history, or have quit smoking within the past 15 years.
A 58-year-old African-American male with a 66 pack-year smoking history presented to a dentist with the complaint of bad breath.
One pack-year of smoking means smoking 1 pack per day for 1 year, or 365 packs.
30, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The American College of Radiology (ACR) supports the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation(Grade B) for low-dose computed tomography (CT) lung cancer screening of adults aged 55 to 80 years who have a 30 pack-year smoking history and currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years.
Recently, the American Association for Thoracic Surgery Task Force for Lung Cancer Screening and Surveillance released clinical guidelines recommending annual lung cancer screenings with low-dose CT for smokers and former smokers age 55 to 79 with a 30 pack-year history, or age 50 with a 20 pack-year history and additional risk factors.