paddock


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pad·dock

 (păd′ək)
n.
1. A fenced area, usually near a stable, used chiefly for grazing horses.
2. Sports
a. An enclosure at a racetrack where the horses are assembled, saddled, and paraded before each race.
b. An area of an automobile racetrack where cars are prepared before a race.
3. Australian A piece of fenced-in land.
tr.v. pad·docked, pad·dock·ing, pad·docks
To confine in a paddock.

[Alteration of Middle English parrok, from Old English pearroc.]

paddock

(ˈpædək)
n
1. a small enclosed field, often for grazing or training horses, usually near a house or stable
2. (Horse Racing) (in horse racing) the enclosure in which horses are paraded and mounted before a race, together with the accompanying rooms
3. (Motor Racing) (in motor racing) an area near the pits where cars are worked on before races
4. Austral and NZ any area of fenced land
5. (Team Sports, other than specified) Austral and NZ a playing field
6. (Agriculture) the long paddock informal Austral a stockroute or roadside area offering feed to sheep and cattle in dry times
vb
(tr) to confine (horses, etc) in a paddock
[C17: variant of dialect parrock, from Old English pearruc enclosure, of Germanic origin. See park]

paddock

(ˈpædək)
n
(Animals) archaic or dialect a frog or toad. Also called (Scot): puddock
[C12: from pad toad, probably from Old Norse padda; see -ock]

pad•dock

(ˈpæd ək)

n.
1. a small, usu. enclosed field near a stable or barn for pasturing or exercising animals.
2. the enclosure in which horses are saddled and mounted before a race.
v.t.
3. to confine in a paddock.
[1615–20; appar. alter. of dial. parrock, Middle English; Old English pearroc enclosure, orig. fence. See park]

paddock


Past participle: paddocked
Gerund: paddocking

Imperative
paddock
paddock
Present
I paddock
you paddock
he/she/it paddocks
we paddock
you paddock
they paddock
Preterite
I paddocked
you paddocked
he/she/it paddocked
we paddocked
you paddocked
they paddocked
Present Continuous
I am paddocking
you are paddocking
he/she/it is paddocking
we are paddocking
you are paddocking
they are paddocking
Present Perfect
I have paddocked
you have paddocked
he/she/it has paddocked
we have paddocked
you have paddocked
they have paddocked
Past Continuous
I was paddocking
you were paddocking
he/she/it was paddocking
we were paddocking
you were paddocking
they were paddocking
Past Perfect
I had paddocked
you had paddocked
he/she/it had paddocked
we had paddocked
you had paddocked
they had paddocked
Future
I will paddock
you will paddock
he/she/it will paddock
we will paddock
you will paddock
they will paddock
Future Perfect
I will have paddocked
you will have paddocked
he/she/it will have paddocked
we will have paddocked
you will have paddocked
they will have paddocked
Future Continuous
I will be paddocking
you will be paddocking
he/she/it will be paddocking
we will be paddocking
you will be paddocking
they will be paddocking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been paddocking
you have been paddocking
he/she/it has been paddocking
we have been paddocking
you have been paddocking
they have been paddocking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been paddocking
you will have been paddocking
he/she/it will have been paddocking
we will have been paddocking
you will have been paddocking
they will have been paddocking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been paddocking
you had been paddocking
he/she/it had been paddocking
we had been paddocking
you had been paddocking
they had been paddocking
Conditional
I would paddock
you would paddock
he/she/it would paddock
we would paddock
you would paddock
they would paddock
Past Conditional
I would have paddocked
you would have paddocked
he/she/it would have paddocked
we would have paddocked
you would have paddocked
they would have paddocked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.paddock - pen where racehorses are saddled and paraded before a racepaddock - pen where racehorses are saddled and paraded before a race
pen - an enclosure for confining livestock

paddock

noun field, meadow, pasture, pen, corral (U.S. & Canad.), stockade The family kept horses in the paddock in front of the house.
Translations
حَقْل صَغير لِتَرويض الخَيْل
výběh
indhegning
bekerített kifutó
hestagirîing
diendaržis
aploks

paddock

[ˈpædək] N (= field) → potrero m; [of racecourse] → paddock m (Motor racing) → parque m

paddock

[ˈpædək] n
(= small field) → enclos m
(in horse racing and motor racing)paddock m

paddock

n (= field)Koppel f; (of racecourse)Sattelplatz m; (Motor Racing) → Fahrerlager nt

paddock

[ˈpædək] n (field) → recinto; (of racecourse) → paddock m inv

paddock

(ˈpӕdək) noun
a small field, containing grass and usually near a house or stable, in which horses etc are often kept.
References in classic literature ?
Levin gazed admiringly at the cows he knew so intimately to the minutest detail of their condition, and gave orders for them to be driven out into the meadow, and the calves to be let into the paddock.
She grew a shade paler, and leaned for a moment against the rail of the paddock in which they were lounging.
In the foreground, in the paddock by the barn, was Mab, full of pretty anxieties for the early spring foal that staggered about her on tottery legs.
Beyond this lay the home paddock, the old orchard, and the stables.
In the paddock some of the horses were being led around.
What he was askin' was too close work for comfort--a double turn, like an S, between a corner of a paddock an' around the corner of the barn to the last swing.
Kit rather wondered what this meant, but as he couldn't stop there, asking questions, he shouldered the box again and followed the girl into the hall, where through a back-door he descried Mr Garland leading Whisker in triumph up the garden, after that self-willed pony had (as he afterwards learned) dodged the family round a small paddock in the rear, for one hour and three quarters.
The atmosphere of the stables and the breath of the blue grass paddock revived in her memory and lingered in her nostrils.
Upon this information, they instantly passed through the hall once more, and ran across the lawn after their father, who was deliberately pursuing his way towards a small wood on one side of the paddock.
It was only play, for Jerry and Norman Chief were tried friends; and, though the huge horse, ears laid back, mouth open to bite, pursued Jerry in mad gyrations all about the paddock, it was with no thought of inflicting hurt, but merely to act up to his part in the sham battle.
On the far side of a garden and paddock the view overlooked a stream, some farm buildings which lay beyond, and the opening of a wooded, rocky pass (called, in Somersetshire, a Combe), which here cleft its way through the hills that closed the prospect.
With what difficulty had they persuaded her to yield them to the paddock for it--the paddock that she loved more dearly than the garden itself