padishah


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Pa·di·shah

 (pä′dĭ-shä′)
n.
1. Used formerly as a title for the monarch of Iran.
2. Used formerly as a title for the sultan of Turkey.

[Persian pādshāh : Old Persian pati-, master; see poti- in Indo-European roots + Persian shāh, king; see shah.]

Padishah

(ˈpɑːdɪˌʃɑː)
n
(Historical Terms) a title of the shah of Iran
[from Persian pādi lord + shah]

pa•di•shah

(ˈpɑ dɪˌʃɑ, -ˌʃɔ)

n.
(often cap.) great king; emperor (a title, esp. of the shah of Iran).
[1605–15; < Persian (poetical form), =pādi- (earlier pati) lord + shāh shah]
Translations
padishah
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References in periodicals archive ?
[25-41] Sultan Shah Rukh is praised as the "Khusraw of his time and place, the world-conquering Alexander of the age"; and since "kingship and religion are twins," the Padishah is obliged to dispense "justice and kindness." (60) He strives to improve security and prosperity in the land and the happiness of his "flock" (ra'aya).
For instance, Koki Padishah, a woman of great charm and cunning, in collusion with Khwaja Khidmatgar Khan, a eunuch of the palace, invited bribes openly from the nobility desiring high offices in the State.
Called Kizilbash (Turkic for "Red Heads" as they wore a distinctive crimson hat with 12 folds denoting their Twelver faith), these men considered Isma'il to be both their religious Murshed-e Kamel ("the Perfect Guide as head of the Safawi order) and their temporal Padishah (king).
The Governor of Guador came onboard our ship and assured us of his unalterable devotion to our glorious Padishah.
After a stroke last week, Uzbekistan's longtime president, 78-year old Islam Karimov -- nicknamed Padishah by local media -- failed to accomplish what was long awaited by his inner circle: a controlled transition of power through the appointment of a successor.
Other kings state openly that they will not hesitate to promptly fulfill all orders that will come from the padishah and they will be honoured to do so.
Such a strong fortress fell in the hand of the Ottoman padishah without even a soldier nose bleed [...];" further on, the chronicler writes about the destruction of the fortress "after the buildings in the fortress were burned to the ground, no trace of the Sebes fortress remained on the face of the Earth" (Groza, 1993:10).
He is surrounded by an increasingly small number of toadies who continuously shout 'Long live my padishah!' It is really a great pity that he finds himself in such a position after having accomplished so much."
127) that was so all-pervasive that the boys at the Galatasaraylycee "could be got only with great difficulty to shout 'Long Live the Padishah!'" (p 127).
With the Reform Edict, Padishah Abdulmecid declared that the lives, properties and decency of his nation was guaranteed and that the taxes would be collected justly due to the income of every one and that the military service and the duration of military service would be reviewed (Oner, 2005, p.246).
Once inside the city, Pullman must choose between the evil Bailiff and his arch rival, the angelic Padishah (or great king), who is a sentimental bore.
The well-armed and indoctrinated Kizilbash - pronounced Qizilbash, Turkic for "Red Heads" as they wore a distinctive crimson hat with 12 folds denoting their Twelver (Ja'fari) Shi'ism - these men considered Isma'il-I to be both their religious Murshid-i Kamil ("the Perfect Guide as head of the Safavi order) and their temporal "Padishah" (king).