padre


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to padre: Padre Pio

pa·dre

 (pä′drā, -drē)
n.
1. Father. Used as a form of address for a priest in Italy, Spain, Portugal, and Latin America.
2. Informal A military chaplain.

[Spanish, Italian, or Portuguese, all from Latin pater, patr-, father; see pəter- in Indo-European roots.]

padre

(ˈpɑːdrɪ)
n (sometimes capital)
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) father: used to address or refer to a clergyman, esp a priest
2. (Military) a chaplain to the armed forces
[via Spanish or Italian from Latin pater father]

pa•dre

(ˈpɑ dreɪ, -dri)

n., pl. -dres.
1. a priest or clergyman.
2. a military chaplain.
[1575–85; < Sp, Portuguese, Italian: father < Latin pater]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.padre - a chaplain in one of the military servicespadre - a chaplain in one of the military services
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
chaplain - a clergyman ministering to some institution
2.padre - `Father' is a term of address for priests in some churches (especially the Roman Catholic Church or the Orthodox Catholic Church)Padre - `Father' is a term of address for priests in some churches (especially the Roman Catholic Church or the Orthodox Catholic Church); `Padre' is frequently used in the military
form of address, title of respect, title - an identifying appellation signifying status or function: e.g. `Mr.' or `General'; "the professor didn't like his friends to use his formal title"
priest - a clergyman in Christian churches who has the authority to perform or administer various religious rites; one of the Holy Orders

padre

noun priest, vicar, parson, preacher, minister, pastor, chaplain, clergyman, rector, curate, man of the cloth Many soldiers found the padre a comforting presence.
Translations

padre

[ˈpɑːdrɪ] N (Mil) → capellán m militar (Univ) → capellán m de colegio; (in direct address) → padre

padre

n (Mil) → Feldkaplan m, → Feldgeistliche(r) m; yes, padreja, Herr Kaplan

padre

[ˈpɑːdrɪ] n
a. (Mil, Naut) → cappellano
b. (fam) (clergyman) → padre m
References in classic literature ?
Certainly in Italy, they hold it a little suspect in popes, when they have often in their mouth Padre commune: and take it to be a sign of one, that meaneth to refer all to the greatness of his own house.
That at least would be entirely right and logical, and the padre with the gold cross would be therefore the man to consult in the matter.
Else why did the fat padre seem so impressed, and why the glass of hot yellow drink from the lean one?
It pleased him that the two padres were so evidently excited.
Sooner or later, if he chose, he could escape into great, grey, formless India, beyond tents and padres and colonels.
these were the very words the padre used) to his present height of prosperity, be well bred, generous, courteous to all, without seeking to vie with those whose nobility is of ancient date, depend upon it, Teresa, no one will remember what he was, and everyone will respect what he is, except indeed the envious, from whom no fair fortune is safe.
A good padre in France read to us from a scroll the whole truth of the matter.
Having procured a black Padre for a guide, and a Spaniard who had served in the Peninsular war as an interpreter, we visited a collection of buildings, of which an ancient church formed the principal part.
That was when he picked up with this outcast padre here.
deviam trazer muitos padres Far o Rei mais rico depois de Salomao
preachers, padres, abbotesses, caloyers, palmers, curates, patriarchs,
Antes dijimos que una de las transacciones mas sencillas es la que se establece desde el nino al padre y pusimos un ejemplo donde el estimulo era: Desde el nino al padre: Mama, tengo sueno.