paedomorphism


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pae·do·mor·pho·sis

 (pē′də-môr′fə-sĭs)
n.
Variant of pedomorphosis2.

pae′do·mor′phism n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

paedomorphism

(ˌpiːdəʊˈmɔːfɪzəm)
n
(Biology) the continuation of juvenile characteristics in the adult stage
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pe•do•mor•phism

or pae•do•mor•phism

(ˌpi dəˈmɔr fɪz əm)

n.
the retention by an adult organism of a juvenile or larval form.
[1890–95]
pe`do•mor′phic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Sanz et al., "Snake venomics and antivenomics of Bothrops atrox venoms from Colombia and the Amazon regions of Brazil, Peruo and Ecuador suggest the occurrence of geographic variation of venom phenotype by a trend towards paedomorphism," Journal of Proteomics, vol.
Perez et al., "Snake population venomics and antivenomics of Bothrops atrox: paedomorphism along its transamazonian dispersal and implications of geographic venom variability on snakebite management," Journal of Proteomics, vol.
The extremely stenobasal shape of branchial plates, characteristic of the juvenile stage of development in many Psammosteus species (Obruchev & Mark-Kurik 2016), is retained in some species of Psammosteus in the adult stage (paedomorphism).
As Lucy Bland explains: "Women, 'lower races' and children" were thought to share a "lack of willpower, emotionality, dependence, imitativeness, and little capacity for abstract thought." (7) Darwin's groundbreaking discoveries in The Origin of the Species (1859) justified the watchful eye of the white British man under the auspices of empire, for civilization, defined as "white, masculine and adult," needed protection from "its antithesis"--the "primitive, female and childlike." (8) Laura Doyle explains that an alternative term for Darwin's scientific racism is paedomorphism, which "aligned all women with the 'lower races' by suggesting that both embodied the childhood of humanity," evolutionary-speaking.