palaeoanthropology

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Related to palaeoanthropological: palaeoanthropologists, paleoanthropologist

palaeoanthropology

(ˌpælɪəʊˌænθrəˈpɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) the branch of anthropology concerned with primitive man
ˌpalaeoˌanthroˈpologist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.palaeoanthropology - the scientific study of human fossilspalaeoanthropology - the scientific study of human fossils
vertebrate paleontology - the paleontology of vertebrates
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Implications of local reaction to recent palaeoanthropological discoveries on an eastern Indonesian island', Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde, Vol.
Stringer, "Using genetic evidence to evaluate four palaeoanthropological hypotheses for the timing of Neanderthal and modern human origins," Journal of Human Evolution, vol.
The two researchers (http://www.mpg.de/7448453/Neandertals-language) from the Max Planck Institute in the Netherlands drew their conclusion based their interpretation of DNA evidence, palaeoanthropological and archaeological discoveries surrounding Neanderthals.
(2008): "Luminescence chronology of cave sediments at the Atapuerca palaeoanthropological site, Spain", Journal of Human Evolution, 55, pp.
(2010), "Using Genetic Evidence to Evaluate Four Palaeoanthropological Hypotheses for the Timing of Neanderthal and Modern Human Origins," Journal of Human Evolution 59: 87-95.
Problems have been identified with the late dates for Ngandong by a number of researchers (Grun and Thorne 1997, Van Den Bergh 1999, Storm 2001 and Westaway 2002); despite this the late dates are often cited in more general palaeoanthropological accounts (e.g.
This is evident from the effects of its neglect until quite recently, and Wallacea, with its many unsolved palaeoanthropological puzzles, offers a salutary lesson in how little we really know about the origins of Australian Indigenes.
Paradoxically, at the same time, major palaeontological and palaeoanthropological discoveries and important theoretical insights were being made in the country.