palaeobiology

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palaeobiology

(ˌpælɪəʊbaɪˈɒlədʒɪ)
n
1. (Palaeontology) the study of fossil plants and animals
2. (Biology) the study of fossil plants and animals
palaeobiological adj
ˌpalaebiˈologist n

paleobiology, palaeobiology

the branch of paleontology that studies fossil plants and animals. — paleobiologist, palaeobiologist, n.paleobiologic, palaeobiologic, paleobiological, palaeobiological, adj.
See also: Fossils
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.palaeobiology - a branch of paleontology that deals with the origin and growth and structure of fossil animals and plants as living organisms
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
fossilology, palaeontology, paleontology - the earth science that studies fossil organisms and related remains
palaeobotany, paleobotany - the study of fossil plants
palaeozoology, paleozoology - the study of fossil animals
References in periodicals archive ?
Eurypterid palaeoecology: palaeobiological, ichnological and comparative evidence for a 'mass-moult-mate' hypothesis.
Drill holes produced by the predatory gastropod Nucella lamellosa (Muricidae): palaeobiological and ecological implications.
Morphological data can also bridge deep-time palaeobiological analyses with studies of the genetic and developmental factors that shape variation and must also influence large-scale patterns of evolutionary change.
On the other hand, the Ordovican ribeirioids have been an overlooked group and outside comprehensive palaeobiological and systematic studies.
Topics of study are diverse and range from the diversity of the Late Jurassic turtles of Europe to the evolution of the latest Cretaceous Iberian dinosaurs and associated fauna, passing through new records of crocodylomorphs in Teruel and the palaeobiological implications based on sauropod tracks from Portugal and Spain, among others.
The morphological features of these five species, their taxonomic position and their palaeobiological implications are discussed.
Palaeobiological significance of Plagiogmus arcuatus from the lower Cambrian of central Australia.
Palaeobiological studies show that in the Estrela more than 5,000 years ago human activity increased to such an extent that at least in some areas it became the dominant factor in the forest dynamics (Van den Brink & Janssen, 1985; Van der Knaap & Van Leeuwen, 1995).
Fossil fishes from the high Canadian Arctic: Further palaeobiological evidence for extreme climatic warmth during the Late Cretaceous (Turonian-Coniacian).
Juusa considering different lithological, geochemical, and palaeobiological criteria allowed us to reconstruct the history of lake-level fluctuations (Punning et al.
Palaeobiological and phylogenetic implications of anatomically-preserved Archaeocalamites from the Dinantian of Oxroad Bay and Loch Humphrey Bum, Scotland.
Further studies will be conducted with regard to the precise dating of these deposits based on zircon, sedimentological analysis and palaeobiological studies of the rich invertebrate trace fossils and vertebrate remains from plant-root-bearing deposits.