palaeography

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palaeography

(ˌpælɪˈɒɡrəfɪ)
n
1. (Historical Terms) the study of the handwritings of the past, and often the manuscripts as well, so that they may be dated, read, etc, and may serve as historical and literary sources
2. (Historical Terms) a handwriting of the past
palaeˈographer n
palaeographic, ˌpalaeoˈgraphical adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

paleography, palaeography

1. ancient forms of writing, as in inscriptions, documents, and manuscripts.
2. the study of ancient writings, including decipherment, translation, and determination of age and date. — paleographer, palaeographer, n.paleographic, palaeographic, adj.
See also: Writing
1. ancient forms of writing, as in inscriptions, documents, and manuscripts.
2. the study of ancient writings, including decipherment, translation, and determination of age and date. — paleographer, palaeographer, n. — paleographic, palaeographic, adj.
See also: Literature
the study of ancient writings, including inscriptions. — paleographer, palaeographer, n.paleographic, palaeographic, adj. papyrology the study of ancient writings on papyrus. — papyrologist, n.
See also: Antiquity
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

palaeography

[ˌpælɪˈɒgrəfɪ] Npaleografía f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Palaeographers call the vestiges of earlier inscriptions preserved in parchment the scripto inferior, or "underwriting," and what is overwritten the scripto secunda.
This means that spectral images may help palaeographers read old manuscripts by enhancing the contrast between the under- and overwriting texts or inks that have partially or completely disappeared.
In their prefatory remarks, the editors of this timely volume, Michael Johnston and Michael van Dussen, highlight the tendency among many medieval book historians to produce "tightly focused analyses of individual manuscripts or small groups of codices" (1), citing James Simpson's critique that palaeographers and codicologists fail to translate their findings into "literary criticism and cultural history." The collection they mastermind--The Medieval Manuscript Book: Cultural Approaches--successfully marks a move away from such tightly focused studies toward a reappraisal of manuscripts as "objects within the cultural world, where people interact with them in meaningful, readable ways" (2).
It will be of interest to scholars from a variety of research fields: ranging from literary studies to social history, from palaeographers and codicologists, to economic historians.
As Susan Rankin says, 'As musical palaeographers, we may be mystified by some of the signs and unable now to reconstruct their specific meaning, but we may also see calligraphic diversity as a rich historical resource'.
This section of Acri's volume will be invaluable both for palaeographers interested in the mechanics of the text, and for a broader range of scholars concerned mainly with the content of the original.
(84) Increasingly, political historians have been joined by a lively community of palaeographers, linguistic experts, and literary scholars in analyzing the documentary culture of late medieval England.
During the 1990s historians of the book placed great emphasis on the 'interdisciplinarity' of their work and certainly much of the excitement of the study came from new and diverse collaboration between historians, bibliographers, palaeographers, literary scholars, librarians, conservationists and students of media and communications.
Historians have identified a whole series of traditions and developments throughout the course of medieval, Enlightenment, and modern times that have contributed to the survival of the Olympics, including the English tradition of medieval peasant recreations and aristocratic tournaments, the "pseudo-Olympics," as Redmond calls them (7), the professional records of historians, travelers, archeologists, cartographers, and palaeographers, the prominence of ancient Greek ideas in the works of educational theorists and philosophers, and the growth of international sport.
I was a very young priest and, unfortunately, quite a stranger as yet to Irish history, whilst he was the very foremost of living Celtic scholars and palaeographers. Nevertheless, he was unassuming as a child, and most kind and considerate in answering the questions which my curiosity and inexperience proposed to him.
Only the complementary evidence of inscriptions can confirm or refute such superficial, visual identifications, and only researchers who are careful, experienced palaeographers and historical linguists can reasonably reliably read many early inscriptions, let alone correctly discern their meaning.