palaeopathology

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palaeopathology

(ˌpælɪəʊpəˈθɒlədʒɪ)
n
1. (Palaeontology) the study of diseases of ancient man and fossil animals
2. (Medicine) the study of diseases of ancient man and fossil animals
ˈpalaeoˌpathoˈlogical adj
ˌpalaeopaˈthologist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

paleopathology, palaeopathology

Medicine. the study of diseases from former times as found in fossils and mummified remains.
See also: Past
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.palaeopathology - the study of disease of former times (as inferred from fossil evidence)
pathology - the branch of medical science that studies the causes and nature and effects of diseases
archaeology, archeology - the branch of anthropology that studies prehistoric people and their cultures
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The study shows that the multidisciplinary analysis of differential funerary practices associated with demographic and palaeopathological patterns provides important information for the interpretation of circumstances of death and burial and how socioeconomic factors influenced the choice of burial beyond the elevated mortality.
Skeletal lesions in human tuberculosis may sometimes heal: an aid to palaeopathological diagnoses.
Palaeopathological, anthropological and genetic studies are also being conducted by Iranian experts from the Iran University of Medical Sciences.
"The alleged Sa-Nakht probably had gigantism, truly being the oldest known palaeopathological case in the world.
The Domestic Camelids (Cetartiodactyla: Camelidae) from the Middle Formative Cemetery of Topater 1 (Atacama Desert, Northern Chile): Osteometric and Palaeopathological Evidence of Cargo Animals.
(2011): Early Pleistocene human mandible from Sima del Elefante (TE) cave site in Sierra de Atapuerca (Spain): A palaeopathological study.
Palaeopathological studies to determine the origins of RA show no evidence of typical RA lesions with marginal erosions at the bone-cartilage interface in skeletal remains from antiquity in Europe and North Africa.
The presence of healed bone fractures in prehistoric skeletons is frequently noted in palaeopathological analyses.