paled


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pale1

pale 1

 (pāl)
n.
1. A stake or pointed stick; a picket.
2. A fence enclosing an area.
3. The area enclosed by a fence or boundary.
4.
a. A region or district lying within an imposed boundary or constituting a separate jurisdiction.
b. Pale The medieval dominions of the English in Ireland. Used with the.
5. Heraldry A wide vertical band in the center of an escutcheon.
tr.v. paled, pal·ing, pales
To enclose with pales; fence in.
Idiom:
beyond the pale
Irrevocably unacceptable or unreasonable: behavior that was quite beyond the pale.

[Middle English, from Old French pal, from Latin pālus; see pag- in Indo-European roots.]

pale 2

 (pāl)
adj. pal·er, pal·est
1. Whitish in complexion; pallid.
2.
a. Of a low intensity of color; light.
b. Having high lightness and low saturation.
3. Of a low intensity of light; dim or faint: "a late afternoon sun coming through the el tracks and falling in pale oblongs on the cracked, empty sidewalks" (Jimmy Breslin).
4. Feeble; weak: a pale rendition of the aria.
v. paled, pal·ing, pales
v.tr.
To cause to turn pale.
v.intr.
1. To become pale; blanch: paled with fright.
2. To decrease in relative importance.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin pallidus, from pallēre, to be pale; see pel- in Indo-European roots.]

pale′ly adv.
pale′ness n.
References in periodicals archive ?
1 : to lose color <She paled when the wound was described to her.>
2 : to make or become less adequate, impressive, or intense <My science project paled in comparison to those of the other students.>
Between December 1917 and February 1918, the cold of winter and desperate shortages of food paled in comparison to the looming threat of a full-scale pogrom.