paleness


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to paleness: Anemia
click for a larger image
pale1

pale 1

 (pāl)
n.
1. A stake or pointed stick; a picket.
2. A fence enclosing an area.
3. The area enclosed by a fence or boundary.
4.
a. A region or district lying within an imposed boundary or constituting a separate jurisdiction.
b. Pale The medieval dominions of the English in Ireland. Used with the.
5. Heraldry A wide vertical band in the center of an escutcheon.
tr.v. paled, pal·ing, pales
To enclose with pales; fence in.
Idiom:
beyond the pale
Irrevocably unacceptable or unreasonable: behavior that was quite beyond the pale.

[Middle English, from Old French pal, from Latin pālus; see pag- in Indo-European roots.]

pale 2

 (pāl)
adj. pal·er, pal·est
1. Whitish in complexion; pallid.
2.
a. Of a low intensity of color; light.
b. Having high lightness and low saturation.
3. Of a low intensity of light; dim or faint: "a late afternoon sun coming through the el tracks and falling in pale oblongs on the cracked, empty sidewalks" (Jimmy Breslin).
4. Feeble; weak: a pale rendition of the aria.
v. paled, pal·ing, pales
v.tr.
To cause to turn pale.
v.intr.
1. To become pale; blanch: paled with fright.
2. To decrease in relative importance.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin pallidus, from pallēre, to be pale; see pel- in Indo-European roots.]

pale′ly adv.
pale′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.paleness - unnatural lack of color in the skin (as from bruising or sickness or emotional distress)paleness - unnatural lack of color in the skin (as from bruising or sickness or emotional distress)
complexion, skin color, skin colour - the coloring of a person's face
2.paleness - the property of having a naturally light complexionpaleness - the property of having a naturally light complexion
complexion, skin color, skin colour - the coloring of a person's face
3.paleness - being deficient in color
color property - an attribute of color
Translations
شُحوب
bledost
bleghed
fakósághalványságsápadtságszíntelenség
fölvi
solgunlukuçukluk

paleness

[ˈpeɪlnɪs] Npalidez f; [of skin] → blancura f

paleness

[ˈpeɪlnɪs] npâleur f

paleness

nBlässe f

paleness

[ˈpeɪlnɪs] npallore m

pale

(peil) adjective
1. (of a person, his face etc) having less colour than normal. a pale face; She went pale with fear.
2. (of a colour) closer to white than black; not dark. pale green.
verb
to become pale. She paled at the bad news.
ˈpaleness noun
References in classic literature ?
You a little remind me of her, my dear lady--you resemble her in complexion: the same creamy paleness. I adore creamy paleness.
She was horrified at her paleness, as she glanced into the looking-glass.
The alterations in the countenance of Sophia had hitherto been chiefly to her disadvantage, and had inclined her complexion to too great paleness; but she now waxed redder, if possible, than vermilion, and cried, "I know not what to say; certainly what arises from gratitude cannot be blamed--But what service can my reading this letter do your friend, since I am resolved never " Mrs Miller fell again to her entreaties, and begged to be forgiven, but she could not, she said, carry it back.
By those best acquainted with his habits, the paleness of the young minister's cheek was accounted for by his too earnest devotion to study, his scrupulous fulfilment of parochial duty, and more than all, to the fasts and vigils of which he made a frequent practice, in order to keep the grossness of this earthly state from clogging and obscuring his spiritual lamp.
A flush appeared on the delicate paleness of Miss Silvester's face.
She let me hold it for a moment, and I saw a flash of ecstatic brilliance in her eye, a glow of glad excitement on her face - I thought my hour of victory was come - but instantly a painful recollection seemed to flash upon her; a cloud of anguish darkened her brow, a marble paleness blanched her cheek and lip; there seemed a moment of inward conflict, and, with a sudden effort, she withdrew her hand, and retreated a step or two back.
Then arose a slim, melancholy girl, whose face had the "interesting" paleness that comes of pills and indi- gestion, and read a "poem." Two stanzas of it will do:
As an emotion of the mind will express itself through any covering of the body, so the paleness which his situation engendered came through the brown upon his cheek, showing the soul to be stronger than the sun.
When he asked what should such fellows as he do crawling between earth and heaven, he was encouraged with loud cries of "Hear, hear!" When he appeared with his stocking disordered (its disorder expressed, according to usage, by one very neat fold in the top, which I suppose to be always got up with a flat iron), a conversation took place in the gallery respecting the paleness of his leg, and whether it was occasioned by the turn the ghost had given him.
On the other side of the house an immense fire had burned itself into clear embers and shed a steady, red reverberation, contrasted strongly with the mellow paleness of the moon.
We cannot say how long the night seemed to Milady, but D'Artagnan believed it to be hardly two hours before the daylight peeped through the window blinds, and invaded the chamber with its paleness. Seeing D'Artagnan about to leave her, Milady recalled his promise to avenge her on the Comte de Wardes.
It was plain, by a paleness still greater than usual, and by those traces which loss of sleep leaves on the face, that he must have passed almost the whole of the night without sleeping.