palaeoanthropology

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palaeoanthropology

(ˌpælɪəʊˌænθrəˈpɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) the branch of anthropology concerned with primitive man
ˌpalaeoˌanthroˈpologist n
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.palaeoanthropology - the scientific study of human fossilspalaeoanthropology - the scientific study of human fossils
vertebrate paleontology - the paleontology of vertebrates
References in periodicals archive ?
"This skull is one of the most complete fossils of hominids more than 3 million years old," said Yohannes Haile-Selassie, the renowned Ethiopian paleoanthropologist of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History who is a co-author of two studies published Wednesday in the journal Nature.
"I have no doubt that this specimen will become one of the iconic specimens in early human evolution," said David Strait, a paleoanthropologist at Washington University in St.
"I feel like Leakey handing it off to Jane Goodall," he said, referencing her mentor, the paleoanthropologist Louis Leakey.
"Basically, males and females are all built from the same genetic blueprint," paleoanthropologist, Ian Tattersall, told (https://www.livescience.com/32467-why-do-men-have-nipples.html) Live Science .
You may have heard of Louis Leakey, the famous paleoanthropologist whose work contributed to what we know about human evolution today.
"Billions of people living today carry a small fraction of Neanderthal genes in their genome -- a distant echo of admixture when our ancestors left Africa and encountered Neanderthals," lead author Philipp Gunz, a paleoanthropologist at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany, was quoted as saying.
In Evolution's Bite , noted paleoanthropologist Peter Ungar brings together for the first time cutting-edge advances in understanding human evolution and climate change with new approaches to uncovering dietary clues from fossil teeth to present a remarkable investigation into the ways that teeth -- their shape, chemistry, and wear -- reveal how we came to be.
1948 - Paleoanthropologist Mary Leakey finds the first partial fossil skull of Proconsul africanus, an ancestor of apes and humans on Rusinga Island, Kenya.
Paleoanthropologist Falk has long studied how and why language, music, art, and science emerged in human ancestors, and when her granddaughter Schofield was diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome, she applied her interests and background to investigating how and why such a disorder would also emerge.
"This is an exciting discovery that confirms other suggestions of an earlier migration out of Africa," paleoanthropologist Rolf Quam of Binghamton University in New York, and a co-author of the study published in the journal Science told Reuters.
Thierra Nalley, a paleoanthropologist. As I'm writing this, she and her coauthors are publishing a description of a baby Australopithecus from Dikika in Ethiopia.
Since the fossil's discovery in 2002, paleoanthropologist Erik Trinkaus of Washington University in St.