palaeoethnobotany

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palaeoethnobotany

(ˌpælɪəʊˌɛθnəʊˈbɒtənɪ)
n
(Palaeontology) the study of fossil seeds and grains to further archaeological knowledge, esp of the domestication of cereals
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"We believe that the plants were burned to induce some level of psychoactive effect, although these plants would not have been as potent as many modern cultivated varieties," added Robert Spengler, director of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History's Paleoethnobotanical Laboratories in Germany.
Paleoethnobotanical data suggest that the consumption of chicha de maiz as a part of ceremonial activities may date to as early as the Formative Period (800-250 B.C.) in the Titicaca Basin, albeit on a much smaller scale than is associated with later regional polities (Logan et al.
Reconstructing the Past: Paleoethnobotanical Evidence for Ancient Maya Plant Use Practices at the Dos Pilas Site, Guatemala.
Razak Abu, University of Saskatchewan, is studying the changing livelihoods of the Cumberland House Metis and Cree Nation; Alix Conway, University of Saskatchewan, is examining how mammalian herbivores affect tree growth and forest composition in the boreal forest; Kelly Eldridge, University of California Davis, is documenting an Early Contact Period migration in Norton Sound, Alaska; and Caitlin Holloway, University of Alaska, is carrying out a paleoethnobotanical study in the Tanana River Basin, Central Alaska.
Paleoethnobotanical Inquiry of Early Euro-American and Ojibwa Gardens on Grand Island, Michigan.
Maya diets of the rich and poor: Paleoethnobotanical evidence from Copan.
In a similar vein, Dee Anne Wymer summarizes paleoethnobotanical evidence from ten Woodland sites in the study area that span a temporal range of 2,000 years, documenting the shift from Early Woodland garden production of Eastern Agricultural Complex plants (maygrass, goosefoot, erect knotweed, little barley, sumpweed, and sunflower) to Late Woodland maize-based field agriculture.
Coprolites, quids, and paleoethnobotanical material are all excellent sources of epidermal material, which mostly has gone unidentified.
Zooarchaeological and paleoethnobotanical data indicate that coastal populations continued to exploit the non-domesticated animal and plant resources even as they intensified maize agriculture (Bergh 2012; Reitz et al.
You are what you drink: reconstructing Middle Horizon (500-1000 C.E.) social dynamics through paleoethnobotanical interpretations of fermented beverage production and consumption at Cerro Baul, Moquegua, Peru.
Our paleoethnobotanical and replicative experimental studies of fuels used in smelting and metalworking clearly reveal careful management of wood and charcoal.