palaeography

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palaeography

(ˌpælɪˈɒɡrəfɪ)
n
1. (Historical Terms) the study of the handwritings of the past, and often the manuscripts as well, so that they may be dated, read, etc, and may serve as historical and literary sources
2. (Historical Terms) a handwriting of the past
palaeˈographer n
palaeographic, ˌpalaeoˈgraphical adj

paleography, palaeography

1. ancient forms of writing, as in inscriptions, documents, and manuscripts.
2. the study of ancient writings, including decipherment, translation, and determination of age and date. — paleographer, palaeographer, n.paleographic, palaeographic, adj.
See also: Writing
1. ancient forms of writing, as in inscriptions, documents, and manuscripts.
2. the study of ancient writings, including decipherment, translation, and determination of age and date. — paleographer, palaeographer, n. — paleographic, palaeographic, adj.
See also: Literature
the study of ancient writings, including inscriptions. — paleographer, palaeographer, n.paleographic, palaeographic, adj. papyrology the study of ancient writings on papyrus. — papyrologist, n.
See also: Antiquity
Translations

palaeography

[ˌpælɪˈɒgrəfɪ] Npaleografía f
References in periodicals archive ?
Paleographers agree in this context to read it as nao/rao [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], 'to disturb', which originally took H as phonetic.
The interest in this book will not be limited to musical paleographers, since scholars in disciplines such as history, liturgy, religion, hagiography, and the arts will certainly benefit from this valuable work.
Charlesworth, in this volume of over 1,000 pages, presents Jesus Research as a multidisciplinary and international work of many viewpoints, not only theologically driven, but an academic discipline that attracts historians, archaeologists, geographers, paleographers, numismatics, oral history specialists, sociologists, and specialists in psychobiology.
They note that the project quickly expanded to include "political historians, literature specialists, art historians, numismatists, archeologists, paleographers, and experts on religion, as well as scholars outside the field of Anglo-Saxon studies" (4).
The word here has a slightly different meaning from that adopted by paleographers of manuscript texts, where it is used to define slightly different readings of the text.
That's when a photograph of the manuscript in a local newspaper caught the eye of two Israeli paleographers, Mordechay Mishor and Edna Engel, who noticed it resembled a different page of Hebrew writing known as the London manuscript, presently part of the private collection of Stephan Loewentheil of New York.
Comparing the inscription with samples from El Morro, paleographers found striking similarities, like flourished descenders (strokes below a word's baseline) on the letters p and the upper case A.
This handsomely produced volume from Brepols, with its sixteen essays and six appendices, marshals an impressive crew of philologists, paleographers, art historians, musicologists, and literary critics to produce the first thoroughgoing, interdisciplinary study of Gautier's masterpiece.
It should be of interest to paleographers, epigraphers, art historians, graphic designers, and all others whose work involves visual language.
Our diverse, often overlapping creeds of post-structuralism, French theory, cultural materialism, New Criticism, New Historicism, and psychoanalysis, among others, mean that our at times interchangeable ranks can range from blogging, face-booking, wiki-ing, early-adopting emissaries of IT to historians of print culture, paleographers, epigraphists, and iconologists.
com experts, including more than 1,500 paleographers (handwriting specialists), spent more than 1.
The next section is a more detailed examination of issues related to bookbindings, a study traditionally ignored by both paleographers and codicologists.