paleography

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pa·le·og·ra·phy

 (pā′lē-ŏg′rə-fē)
n.
1. The study and scholarly interpretation of earlier, especially ancient, writing and forms of writing.
2.
a. The documents whose writing is so studied.
b. The manner of writing in an earlier, especially ancient, document or set of documents.

pa′le·og′ra·pher n.
pa′le·o·graph′ic (-ə-grăf′ĭk), pa′le·o·graph′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.

paleography

(ˌpælɪˈɒɡrəfɪ)
n
(Historical Terms) a variant spelling of palaeography

pa•le•og•ra•phy

(ˌpeɪ liˈɒg rə fi; esp. Brit. ˌpæl i-)

n.
1. ancient writing or forms of writing, as in documents and inscriptions.
2. the study of ancient writings.
[1810–20]
pa`le•og′ra•pher, n.
pa`le•o•graph′ic (-əˈgræf ɪk) pa`le•o•graph′i•cal, adj.

paleography, palaeography

1. ancient forms of writing, as in inscriptions, documents, and manuscripts.
2. the study of ancient writings, including decipherment, translation, and determination of age and date. — paleographer, palaeographer, n.paleographic, palaeographic, adj.
See also: Writing
1. ancient forms of writing, as in inscriptions, documents, and manuscripts.
2. the study of ancient writings, including decipherment, translation, and determination of age and date. — paleographer, palaeographer, n. — paleographic, palaeographic, adj.
See also: Literature
the study of ancient writings, including inscriptions. — paleographer, palaeographer, n.paleographic, palaeographic, adj. papyrology the study of ancient writings on papyrus. — papyrologist, n.
See also: Antiquity

paleography

The study of ancient manuscripts.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.paleography - the study of ancient forms of writing (and the deciphering of them)paleography - the study of ancient forms of writing (and the deciphering of them)
archaeology, archeology - the branch of anthropology that studies prehistoric people and their cultures
epigraphy - the study of ancient inscriptions
Translations

paleography

nPaläografie f
References in periodicals archive ?
As Werning's title indicates, this is not meant to be a theological exposition of the Book of Caverns, but rather a highly detailed analysis of the transmission of the composition from the Ramesside through the Late Period, as well as a grammatical and paleographical study of the text.
He starts by detailing the different types of errors that occur; explaining how metrical regularities can provide an objective way to evaluate potential errors and propose possible emendations through statistical data that avoids ethnocentrism; and providing a detailed overview of how these things relate to the major metrical, lexical, semantic, mythological, and paleographical arguments for dating Beowulf.
One wishes for more paleographical analysis--more detail about the actual document at hand, something closer to the critical apparatuses that accompany the volumes in the Schoenberg Kritische Gesamtausgabe (abbreviated hereinafter, as on the ASC Web site, as the KG), and so I turned to it for some assistance.
Little is known about the origins of the manuscript Beinecke Library, MS 918; its paleographical features suggest that the manuscript most likely dates to the fourth quarter of the thirteenth century or the first quarter of the fourteenth century.
The editors state in their preface that the multi-disciplinarian approach allows modern scientific interest, intellectual history, and philosophy, coupled with linguistic and paleographical skills to combine and inspire each other to produce a sound critical edition with intellectual engagement.
in order to sustain her paleographical analysis, which refutes an earlier interpretation and helps us understand how Boccaccio's interest in Aristotle's concept of eudamia as a practical, social good is reflected in his greatest work.
Particularly noteworthy here is the paleographical work of Linne Mooney and Estelle Stubbs, as this work has revealed the Guildhall to have been a major centre for the copying of late medieval English literature.
Their vital paleographical work allows the other authors in this issue to consider the Arbury plays as the work of one man, a premise that has indeed inspired them to connect the plays to the Newdigate family more extensively and with more fruitful results than ever before.
In bibliographical (rather than codicological) terms, all these copies then become part of the same "issue", even while the slight paleographical variation between copies means that they are not strictly of the same "state".
Maunde Thompson provided paleographical arguments in support of the claim.
Petti has this to say in his paleographical handbook, English Literary Hands (1977), p 35, under rule 8: (4)
Paleographical Problems in Vaticanus Latinus 7207, II.