palaeography

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palaeography

(ˌpælɪˈɒɡrəfɪ)
n
1. (Historical Terms) the study of the handwritings of the past, and often the manuscripts as well, so that they may be dated, read, etc, and may serve as historical and literary sources
2. (Historical Terms) a handwriting of the past
palaeˈographer n
palaeographic, ˌpalaeoˈgraphical adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

paleography, palaeography

1. ancient forms of writing, as in inscriptions, documents, and manuscripts.
2. the study of ancient writings, including decipherment, translation, and determination of age and date. — paleographer, palaeographer, n.paleographic, palaeographic, adj.
See also: Writing
1. ancient forms of writing, as in inscriptions, documents, and manuscripts.
2. the study of ancient writings, including decipherment, translation, and determination of age and date. — paleographer, palaeographer, n. — paleographic, palaeographic, adj.
See also: Literature
the study of ancient writings, including inscriptions. — paleographer, palaeographer, n.paleographic, palaeographic, adj. papyrology the study of ancient writings on papyrus. — papyrologist, n.
See also: Antiquity
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

palaeography

[ˌpælɪˈɒgrəfɪ] Npaleografía f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Among their topics are collaborative manuscript production and the case of Reykjab k: paleographical and multi-spectral analysis, Sveinsb k: a reexamination of a fragment of Njal's saga, the historical present tense in the earliest textual transmission of Njal's saga: an example of synchronic linguistic variation in the 14th-century Icelandic Njal's saga manuscripts, the post-medieval production and dissemination of Njal's saga manuscripts, and creating in color: illustrations of Njal's saga in a 19th-century Icelandic paper manuscript.
(79) Just as the "elementary learning" subdivision comes at the end of the "Six Arts" and lists the lexicographical and paleographical works that facilitated the analysis and interpretation of other ancient sources, the "Yiwen zhi" validates the texts and traditions invoked within the first nine treatises.
In volume 1:58-117, he includes thorough philological descriptions of the sources, while referring readers to other studies for the paleographical and codicological details of the manuscripts.
He starts by detailing the different types of errors that occur; explaining how metrical regularities can provide an objective way to evaluate potential errors and propose possible emendations through statistical data that avoids ethnocentrism; and providing a detailed overview of how these things relate to the major metrical, lexical, semantic, mythological, and paleographical arguments for dating Beowulf.
As far as I have been able to determine, there is only one extended paleographical description of the Leiden manuscript, written in 1962 by the eminent Anglo-Normanist Ruth J.
The editors state in their preface that the multi-disciplinarian approach allows modern scientific interest, intellectual history, and philosophy, coupled with linguistic and paleographical skills to combine and inspire each other to produce a sound critical edition with intellectual engagement.
in order to sustain her paleographical analysis, which refutes an earlier interpretation and helps us understand how Boccaccio's interest in Aristotle's concept of eudamia as a practical, social good is reflected in his greatest work.
Particularly noteworthy here is the paleographical work of Linne Mooney and Estelle Stubbs, as this work has revealed the Guildhall to have been a major centre for the copying of late medieval English literature.
Their vital paleographical work allows the other authors in this issue to consider the Arbury plays as the work of one man, a premise that has indeed inspired them to connect the plays to the Newdigate family more extensively and with more fruitful results than ever before.
Treating the chansonniers as cultural artifacts themselves, she uses paleographical and codicological evidence to reinforce the assertion that all five manuscripts came from approximately the same time and place.
Petti has this to say in his paleographical handbook, English Literary Hands (1977), p 35, under rule 8: (4)