palaeography

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palaeography

(ˌpælɪˈɒɡrəfɪ)
n
1. (Historical Terms) the study of the handwritings of the past, and often the manuscripts as well, so that they may be dated, read, etc, and may serve as historical and literary sources
2. (Historical Terms) a handwriting of the past
palaeˈographer n
palaeographic, ˌpalaeoˈgraphical adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

paleography, palaeography

1. ancient forms of writing, as in inscriptions, documents, and manuscripts.
2. the study of ancient writings, including decipherment, translation, and determination of age and date. — paleographer, palaeographer, n.paleographic, palaeographic, adj.
See also: Writing
1. ancient forms of writing, as in inscriptions, documents, and manuscripts.
2. the study of ancient writings, including decipherment, translation, and determination of age and date. — paleographer, palaeographer, n. — paleographic, palaeographic, adj.
See also: Literature
the study of ancient writings, including inscriptions. — paleographer, palaeographer, n.paleographic, palaeographic, adj. papyrology the study of ancient writings on papyrus. — papyrologist, n.
See also: Antiquity
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

palaeography

[ˌpælɪˈɒgrəfɪ] Npaleografía f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
So in these paleographically dated works one can trace the young Harley scribe's progress in schooled reading, mainly in French, sometimes in English--all of it overlying a bedrock of scriptural, liturgical, and scientific Latin--alongside years of applied scrivening that reinforced his studies.
Despite the fact that one can easily explain paleographically how the error entered the tradition of transmission, there are several modern scholars who pointed to John Quidort as the source of the view.
The form of his name varied in Han texts, sometimes recorded as Fuqiu, sometimes Baoqiu But because Fu and Bao [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] are phonologically similar and paleographically interchangeable in pre-Han and Han texts, scholars generally hold that the two were the same person.
It is true that no two manuscripts can ever be paleographically or codicologically identical, even if copied one after the other, by the same scribe and containing identical music.
Fragments of eight manuscripts of the Damascus Document were found in three of the Qumran caves (5Q12, 6Q15 and 4Q265273) (Vermes 1995:95) with scripts dated paleographically from the first century BCE to the first century CE.
palmleaf manuscript, paleographically, it is not older than the late
Indeed, Haley acknowledges that the former case is "paleographically unlikely," nevertheless insisting that "the literary probability is strong that sowre is what Shakespeare actually wrote" (46-47, n.
Loseff's claim that the second gathering is paleographically distinct, however, requires qualification.
The easiest emendation paleographically is Sylburg's [Characters Omitted], which is indeed printed in the latest edition of Photius;(19) if correct, this would put Semonides in the late sixth century along with Hipponax, since Amyntas' reign lasted from 540 to 498.
Paleographically speaking, the emendation speaks for itself: o for a, t for f and c for the loop of d are all commonplace errors.
Of course, circles, virgules, and seeming carets are tricky to date paleographically, so it is worth checking whether they were not prompts to Caxton's edition but were the work of somebody collating manuscript HM 136 against Caxton's edition at a later date.