paleoliberal

pa·le·o·lib·e·ral

 (pā′lē-ō-lĭb′ər-əl, -lĭb′rəl)
adj. Informal
Extremely or stubbornly liberal in political matters.

pa′le·o·lib′e·ral n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Estos presupuestos tan restringidos reflejan una fase paleoliberal del constitucionalismo (...)".
I don't see any alternative to such an endeavour of civilizing the market economy: in times of the global competition between national locations it is even more important to promote the transition of the global market economy from the paleoliberal "state of nature" in which the right of the stronger rules into a cosmopolitan state of law.
In Italy, Betori has a profile as a centrist, so much so that one traditionalist commentator recently tagged him as a member of the church's "paleoliberal" wing, allegedly working behind the scenes to hamstring Benedict's pontificate.
Multiculturalism and political correctness are odd bogeymen for Brustein, a quintessential paleoliberal who in Cultural Calisthenics is still calling for "a new Civilian Conservation Corps to turn gun-toting inner-city youth into skilled artisans" and a federal works project for artists.
Sadly, my concerns about the unevenness and unfairness of the medical system in the United States are not just paleoliberal gripes.
New Republic writer Michelle Cottle returned from maternity leave to find Washington fit for a "Tarantino-style blood bath," with the Democratic front-runner cast as a "paleoliberal ...
They saw Gore as holding the paleoliberal view of government's role as protecting people and solving problems for them rather than the New Democratic view that government should equip people with the tools to tackle their own problems.
To a dedicated foe of the "paleoliberal" welfare state like Morris, the A.A.R.P.
Similarly, would Mickey Kaus object to Hillary's interest in the Resolution Trust Corporation if she did not support the "paleoliberal" notion that the property belonging to failed S&Ls should be sold off at modest prices to ordinary people?