palaeontology

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palaeontology

(ˌpælɪɒnˈtɒlədʒɪ)
n
1. (Palaeontology) the study of fossils to determine the structure and evolution of extinct animals and plants and the age and conditions of deposition of the rock strata in which they are found. See also palaeobotany, palaeozoology
2. (Palaeontology) another name for palaeozoology
[C19: from palaeo- + onto- + -logy]
palaeontological adj
ˌpalaeˌontoˈlogically adv
ˌpalaeonˈtologist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

paleontology, palaeontology

1. the science of the forms of life existing in prior geologie periods from their fossilized remains.
2. an article on paleontology. — paleontologist. palaeontologist, n.paleontologie, palaeontologic, paleontological, palaeontological, adj.
See also: Fossils
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.palaeontology - the earth science that studies fossil organisms and related remainspalaeontology - the earth science that studies fossil organisms and related remains
frill - (paleontology) a bony plate that curves upward behind the skull of many ceratopsian dinosaurs
palaeobiology, paleobiology - a branch of paleontology that deals with the origin and growth and structure of fossil animals and plants as living organisms
earth science - any of the sciences that deal with the earth or its parts
micropaleontology - the paleontology of microfossils
vertebrate paleontology - the paleontology of vertebrates
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

palaeontology

[ˌpælɪɒnˈtɒlədʒɪ] Npaleontología f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

palaeontology

paleontology [ˌpæliɒnˈtɒlədʒi] npaléontologie f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

palaeontology

paleontology (Am) [ˌpælɪɒnˈtɒlədʒɪ] npaleontologia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
If you ever get back to the outer world you will find that the geologists and paleontologists will be the first to set you down a liar, for they know that no such creatures as they restore ever existed.
From later observation--I mention this as worthy the attention of paleontologists and naturalists--I came to the conclusion that such creatures as the cave-bear, the cave-lion and the saber-tooth tiger, as well as the larger carnivorous reptiles make, ordinarily, two kills a day--one in the morning and one after night.
Like a paleontologist, able to reconstruct an entire skeleton from one fossil bone, he was able to reconstruct a whole speech from the one word REVOLUTION.
The long-necked dinosaur deserves a genus distinct from that of Apatosaurus, European paleontologists report April 7 in PeerJ.
Since then, paleontologists led by a team at the University of Colorado at Denver have studied them and prepared them for display.
At the 5E Ranch, paleontologists recently identified a new species of dinosaur.
With these fossils, paleontologists have pieced together an ancient forest ecosystem called the Jehol (JEE-hole) Forest.
The paleontologists who unearthed the 130-million-year-old fossils in northeastern China announced in October that their find provides the first direct evidence that tyrannosaurs had protofeathers.
These scientists are called paleontologists, but they aren't the only ones who can find dinosaurs.
For adventure buffs and paleontologists. Susan Offner, Teacher, Lexington H.S., Lexington, MA
In just the last three years, paleontologists have made front-page news by recovering South American fossils of Gigantosaurus carolinii, an eight-ton predator even larger than the familiar Tyrannosaurus rex; extremely rare soft-tissue fossils of the organs of a baby dinosaur in China; and the fossilized remains of the smallest mammal yet found, a five-gram, tree-dwelling creature in Wyoming.
Four years ago, paleontologists described a species of feathered dinosaur from China that they named Microraptor gui (SN: 1/25/03,p.