palimpsest


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pal·imp·sest

 (păl′ĭmp-sĕst′)
n.
1. A manuscript, typically of papyrus or parchment, that has been written on more than once, with the earlier writing incompletely scraped off or erased and often legible.
2. An object or area that has extensive evidence of or layers showing activity or use: "My skin had become a palimpsest of fleeting sensations, and each layer bore the imprint of who I was" (Paul Auster).

[Latin palimpsēstum, from Greek palimpsēston, neuter of palimpsēstos, scraped again : palin, again; see kwel- in Indo-European roots + psēn, to scrape.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

palimpsest

(ˈpælɪmpˌsɛst)
n
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a manuscript on which two or more successive texts have been written, each one being erased to make room for the next
adj
1. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) (of a text) written on a palimpsest
2. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) (of a document) used as a palimpsest
[C17: from Latin palimpsestus parchment cleaned for reuse, from Greek palimpsēstos, from palin again + psēstos rubbed smooth, from psēn to scrape]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pal•imp•sest

(ˈpæl ɪmpˌsɛst)

n.
a parchment or the like from which writing has been partially or completely erased to make room for another text.
[1655–65; < Latin palimpsēstus < Greek palímpsēstos rubbed again =pálin again + psēstós scraped, rubbed, v. adj. of psân to rub smooth]
pal`imp•ses′tic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

palimpsest

- Can describe a manuscript or writing surface that has been reused, erased, or altered while retaining traces of its earlier form—and, by extension, an object, place, or area that reflects its history.
See also related terms for manuscript.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

palimpsest

a parchment from which earlier writing has been partially or completely removed by scraping so that it may be used again. — palimpsestic, adj.
See also: Manuscripts
a piece of parchment or vellum from which earlier writing has been erased or scraped off to allow for reuse. — palimpsestic, adj.
See also: Books
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.palimpsest - a manuscript (usually written on papyrus or parchment) on which more than one text has been written with the earlier writing incompletely erased and still visible
holograph, manuscript - handwritten book or document
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
palimpsest
palimpsest
palimpszeszt
palimpsestus
palimpsest
palimpsest
palimpsest

palimpsest

[ˈpælɪmpsest] Npalimpsesto m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

palimpsest

nPalimpsest m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
I scanned a leaf particu- larly and saw that it was a palimpsest. Under the old dim writing of the Yankee historian appeared traces of a penmanship which was older and dimmer still -- Latin words and sentences: fragments from old monk- ish legends, evidently.
Beloved by one, a sort of instinctive and savage half-man, for its beauty, for its stature, for the harmonies which emanated from its magnificent ensemble; beloved by the other, a learned and passionate imagination, for its myth, for the sense which it contains, for the symbolism scattered beneath the sculptures of its front,--like the first text underneath the second in a palimpsest,--in a word, for the enigma which it is eternally propounding to the understanding.
His mirror of vision was silver-clear, a flashing, dazzling palimpsest of imagery.
Holmes and I sat together in silence all the evening, he engaged with a powerful lens deciphering the remains of the original inscription upon a palimpsest, I deep in a recent treatise upon surgery.
"Well, Watson, it's as well we have not to turn out to-night," said Holmes, laying aside his lens and rolling up the palimpsest. "I've done enough for one sitting.
"It will be harder to read now than that palimpsest. Well, well, it can't be helped.
The contributors to this issue partake in Professor Shoukri's conviction that to appreciate the contemporary, gazing at it is not enough: you need to think of texts in their palimpsest quality and read what has been erased or covered in the process of innovating.
Turtle Island, and other original names, exist as a palimpsest for the myth and reality of contemporary Canada.
While Palimpsest may be one of the most direct beneficiaries from the Potter phenomenon, Scots book shops and the retail trade have been benefiting from JK Rowling's magical creations ever since they first took off seven years ago.
Ellison ultimately arrives at the form of the palimpsest: a synchronous conflation or superimposition of multiple historical periods upon the present.
And when I was asked in 1989 (by which time I'd become good friends with Etel and her publisher partner Simone Fattal) to write the back-cover blurb for the American-English edition of Adnan's The Arab Apocalypse, I found myself in the presence of an immensely important work--a tapestry (for Etel is also a great creator of tapestries and in this work has transferred many of the intricacies of weaving to the written word), as well as a contemporary palimpsest, in the sense that the verbal constructions are punctuated throughout with both pictographic and hieroglyphic forms, amid images of militant thrusts, cries, gasps, stutters, abruptions and burning suns.
A handwritten or typewritten page therefore is usually to some degree a palimpsest; it contains parts and relics of its own history--erasures, passages crossed out, interlineations--suggesting that there is something to go back to as well as something to go forward to.