palisade layer

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palisade layer

n.
A layer below the upper epidermis of a leaf made up of columnar cells that have numerous chloroplasts and are oriented with the long axis of each cell perpendicular to the leaf surface. Also called palisade parenchyma.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pal·i·sade layer

(păl′ĭ-sād′)
A layer of cells just below the upper surface of most leaves, consisting of cylindrical cells that contain many chloroplasts and stand at right angles to the leaf surface. Also called palisade parenchyma. See more at photosynthesis.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
As the concentration of TX-100 increases, the rise in the population of pre-aggregates, aggregates and micelles favors the incorporation of BDC in the palisade layers, intensifying the fluorescence.
According to Kumbhakar et al., one of the reasons for the high viscosity in this microenvironment, also known as palisade layer, is the hydration of ions, especially cations, since water molecules in this region tends to undergo a kind of clustering [29].
Based on this information, the [E.sub.T](30) of the palisade layer of TX-100 should be typical of oligomers based on glycol.
The steady-state fluorescence measurements confirms that the microdomain in which BDC is preferentially allocated in Triton X-100 micelles (the palisade layer) is considerably polar (46.9 kcal [mol.sup.-1]) and highly viscous (70.3 cP).
The strong correlation coefficients obtained between thickness of total and palisade layers, as eggshell ultrastructure traits, and breaking strength (0.92 and 0.85, respectively) and shell thickness (0.85 and 0.80, respectively) indicated the possibility of use the destructive traits as good predictors for eggshell ultrastructure properties.
The destructive measurements (breaking strength and shell thickness) individually or together are accurate predictors for total and Palisade layers.
Data on non-destructive (weight, length and width of egg) and destructive (breaking strength and shell thickness) measurements, as predictors, and the ultrastructure eggshell properties (total, thickness of palisade layer, cone layer and total score), as response variables, were analyzed according to the following regression model of SAS (2005):
Prediction of palisade layer: It appeared that weight, length and width of the egg together ([E.sub.11]) or individually ([E.sub.8], [E.sub.9], and [E.sub.10], respectively) were not efficient in predicting the thickness of palisade layer ([R.sup.2] = 0.04 to 0.12).
Chlorenchyma distinct; palisade layers two, distinct; spongy mesophyll
differentiated; palisade layer distinct; spongy mesophyll with more than
Chlorenchyma differentiated; palisade layer distinct; spongy mesophyll
palisade layer distinct; spongy mesophyll with less than five layers;