palliard

palliard

(ˈpælɪɑːd)
n
archaic an expert beggar; an unsavoury character
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Palliard manufactures steering axles with calliper disc or drum brakes (using KNOTT brake technology) for self-propelled machines of up to 13 tons dynamic load capacity per axle.
The new collection How Real Men Do It (Palliard Press) will archive Barela's final episodes of the popular series.
In his day the crime reporter's column was full of exciting words such as palliards, clapper dudgeons, whipjacks, priggers and dummerers, not to mention the odd kinchin mort!
He said: "The Elizabethan and Jacobean equivalent of modern 'scroungers' were known as 'rufflers', 'palliards' or 'clapperdogeons' ...dangerous vagrants who allegedly plastered their bodies with fake sores to dupe the unwary into providing assistance.
(62) Thomas Harman's Caveat for Common Cursitors, an early classic of the emergent genre of rogue literature, claims to survey at first hand a worthless and predatory "fraternity" organized into criminal specializations (rufflers, priggers, palliards, Abraham men), armed with a horrifying repertoire of stratagems, and protected by an arcane language of its own.