palliation


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Related to palliation: habiliments

pal·li·ate

 (păl′ē-āt′)
tr.v. pal·li·at·ed, pal·li·at·ing, pal·li·ates
1.
a. To make less severe or intense; mitigate. See Synonyms at relieve.
b. To alleviate the symptoms of (a disease or disorder).
2. To make (an offense or crime) seem less serious; extenuate.

[Middle English palliaten, from Late Latin palliāre, palliāt-, to cloak, palliate, from Latin pallium, cloak.]

pal′li·a′tion n.
pal′li·a′tor n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.palliation - easing the severity of a pain or a disease without removing the cause
alleviation, easement, easing, relief - the act of reducing something unpleasant (as pain or annoyance); "he asked the nurse for relief from the constant pain"
2.palliation - to act in such a way as to cause an offense to seem less serious
reduction, step-down, diminution, decrease - the act of decreasing or reducing something

palliation

noun
Freedom, especially from pain:
Translations

palliation

n paliación f
References in classic literature ?
These circumstances are cited in palliation of the doubts and surmises of Captain Thorn, which might otherwise appear strange and unreasonable.
An enemy may at any time obtain your commendation by only deserving it; and the utmost which the faults of your friends can hope for, is your silence; or, perhaps, if too severely accused, your gentle palliation.
Meanwhile, John had gone upon his holidays without a word, which was irregular; and there had disappeared with him a certain sum of money, which was out of all bounds of palliation. But he was known to be careless, and believed to be honest; the manager besides had a regard for him; and little was said, although something was no doubt thought, until the fortnight was finally at an end, and the time had come for John to reappear.
Now, my good friend, speak out; for the time for any palliation or concealment is past, and nothing will avail Ralph Nickleby now.'
If he began to talk about the crops; or about the recent weather; or about the condition of politics; or about dogs, or cats, or morals, or theology -- no matter what -- I sighed, for I knew what was coming; he was going to get out of it a palliation of that tiresome seven-dollar sale.
She could neither wonder nor condemn, but the belief of his self-conquest brought nothing to her consolatory to her bosom, afforded no palliation of her distress.
He was anxious, while vindicating himself, to say nothing unkind of the others: but there was only one amongst them whose conduct he could mention without some necessity of defence or palliation. "We have all been more or less to blame," said he, "every one of us, excepting Fanny.
Roxana stood awhile looking mutely down on him while he writhed in shame and went on incoherently babbling self-accusations mixed with pitiful attempts at explanation and palliation of his crime; then she seated herself and took off her hat, and her unkept masses of long brown hair tumbled down about her shoulders.
Thenceforth they gave up all attempts at cure or palliation. The doomed sufferer submitted to his fate, resumed his former loathsome affection for the bosom fiend, and spent whole miserable days before a looking-glass, with his mouth wide open, watching, in hope and horror, to catch a glimpse of the snake's head far down within his throat.
The major contrasts occurred for palliation and diagnostic evaluation only.
In each case he tries to isolate what he has defined as "the central error of act, will, understanding which, once made, has been permanent, incurable, but whose diagnosis and palliation are the hopes of continuance." Rosacoke Mustian, the naive protagonist of A Long and Happy Life, erroneously assumes that marriage to Wesley Beavers will lead to the romantic state of the title.
"These kids can be kept on a [phenylalanine-free] diet, but that's palliation, not a cure,' Ledley told SCIENCE NEWS.