palliative

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pal·li·a·tive

 (păl′ē-ā′tĭv, -ē-ə-tĭv)
adj.
1. Tending or serving to palliate.
2. Alleviating the symptoms of a disease or disorder, especially one that is terminal, when a cure is not available.
n.
One that palliates, especially a palliative drug or medicine.

pal′li·a′tive·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

palliative

(ˈpælɪətɪv) or

palliatory

adj
serving to palliate; relieving without curing
n
something that palliates, such as a sedative drug or agent
ˈpalliatively adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pal•li•a•tive

(ˈpæl iˌeɪ tɪv, -i ə tɪv)

adj.
1. serving to palliate: a palliative medicine.
n.
2. something that palliates.
[1535–45; < Middle French palliatif]
pal′li•a`tive•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.palliative - remedy that alleviates pain without curingpalliative - remedy that alleviates pain without curing
curative, cure, therapeutic, remedy - a medicine or therapy that cures disease or relieve pain
Adj.1.palliative - moderating pain or sorrow by making it easier to bearpalliative - moderating pain or sorrow by making it easier to bear
moderating - lessening in intensity or strength
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

palliative

noun
1. drug, painkiller, sedative, tranquillizer, anodyne, analgesic, demulcent, calmative, lenitive Insulin merely acts as a palliative.
2. temporary measure, stopgap, temporary expedient The loan was a palliative, not a cure, for their financial troubles.
adjective
1. soothing, calming, mollifying, anodyne, demulcent, calmative, lenitive, mitigatory the importance of palliative care in hospitals
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
paliativní
palliativPalliativum

palliative

[ˈpælɪətɪv]
A. ADJpaliativo, lenitivo
B. Npaliativo m, lenitivo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

palliative

[ˈpæliətɪv] n
(= drug, treatment) → palliatif m
(to problem)palliatif m
a palliative to sth → un palliatif à qch
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

palliative

(form)
adj drug, remedy, effectlindernd; explanationbeschönigend
nLinderungsmittel nt, → Palliativ(um) nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

palliative

[ˈpælɪətɪv] npalliativo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

pal·li·a·tive

a. paliativo-a, lenitivo-a, que alivia.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

palliative

adj paliativo
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The future of medicine will look to identifying and removing the causes of conditions like diabetes, instead of employing patented synthetic drugs and synthetic replacement therapies (which feed the deficiency), palliatively - especially considering the new research indicating they actually make the patient far worse.
"Healthcare staff treated Mr Nixon palliatively, focusing on his symptoms and pain management.
We performed a retrospective analysis of patients treated palliatively for renal cell metastases to bone with conventionally fractionated radiation in the modern era to evaluate response to conventional fractioned radiation.
"So from the start we were told she would be treated palliatively so there was no cure but she could live with the cancer if we could keep it at bay.
Patients with a poor general condition were treated palliatively and only received 30 Gy in 10 fractions (i.e.