palmation


Also found in: Medical.

pal·ma·tion

 (păl-mā′shən, päl-, pä-mā′-)
n.
1. The state of being palmate.
2.
a. A palmate structure or form.
b. A division or part of a palmate structure.

palmation

(pælˈmeɪʃən)
n
1. the state of being palmate
2. a projection or division of a palmate structure
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2009, at 3 1/2, Moose grew into a 125-class 10-pointer with a few kickers and no palmation. However, he followed the exact same activity pattern as the previous year: He was on camera that summer, then left in early September and returned during the post-rut.
A mountain caribou will weigh 600 pounds and the mass of their main beams and palmation on the tops of their horns is unbelievable.
While woodland antlers don't have long, sweeping beams and huge spreads, they often have lots of mass, good palmation, and multiple points on each side.
Then we got a glimpse of what seemed a genuine monster with incredible palmation. I fingered the rifle for just a moment, but by then it was too dark for a certain shot.
Top palmation is relatively rare, but back points are not uncommon.
Its rack was both wide and high, and the heavy tops featured a good number of points and some palmation. The bezs were long and well-formed, and while it sported just the single shovel so prevalent in the Mulchatna herd, I knew this bull was the one.
Picking a bull with palmation up top and massive bottoms, I fired offhand.
Although a rack may appear very tall and impressive from the front or the rear, the "paddles" or palmation can be judged only from the side.
The buck, a youngster, had serious palmation on his antlers, and better yet, didn't sport the necessary four points on a side to be legal under our current regulations.