palstave


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palstave

(ˈpɔːlˌsteɪv)
n
(Archaeology) archaeol a kind of celt, usually of bronze, made to fit into a split wooden handle rather than having a socket for the handle
[C19: from Danish paalstav, from Old Norse, from páll spade + stafr staff1]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

palstave

An ancient bronze implement like an ax head, made to fit into a split wooden handle.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
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References in periodicals archive ?
Also found was a decorated gold strip, possibly from a third bracelet, plus a bronze dagger and a palstave - a type of chisel.
(1987): "A pair of bronze palstave moulds from Harling", Norfolk Archaeology, 40, pp.
The bronze moulds for palstaves from La Macolla (Linares de Riofrio, Salamanca).
A palstave axe and spearhead were found together at Denwick, near Alnwick, in 1832.
A large hoard including one palstave, seven spearheads, and three rapiers was found at Farnley, near Corbridge, during the building of the North Eastern Railway in 1835.
A palstave and a socketed axe were found together just west of Haydon Bridge in 1835-6 during the cutting of the North Eastern Railway.
But upon further inspection, he found 11 pieces carefully buried together in a specially dug pit, made up of seven complete bronze socketed axes, fragments of three further axes and one near complete late palstave. "I just couldn't believe it," he said.
Al contrario que en la palstave comentada, si hay un objeto metalico proveniente de la mina cuya interpretacion instrumental resulta incierta.
Experts say an axe is generally deemed to be a palstave if it is hafted by means of a forked wooden handle kept in place with high, cast flanges and stop bar.
The hoard, dating between 1300BC and 1150BC and consisting of five bronze palstaves - a type of early axe - was discovered by a metal-detectorist in Nantmel, Powys, during August and September 2009.
Recruiting other types of evidence for exchanges with the Near East in this Portuguese region, such as the so-called Cabeco da Maria Candal (Beira) hoard containing tools of Atlantic typologies (palstaves, axes, a chisel) and likely imported from the Near East metalsmith's tongs, the author postulates the local adoption of Near Eastern units of exchange by the locals (Ruiz-Galvez 2014, 175, Fig.
They were found buried alongside two palstaves - a type of axe - and a chisel within a small pot.