pancosmic

pancosmic

(ˌpænˈkɒzmɪk)
adj
of every cosmos
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References in periodicals archive ?
That pancosmic process is reality, and Christ names it.
When the soul surrenders its limited bodily structure at death, it becomes "pancosmic," all-cosmic, even more open to God's one creation, more deeply connected to creation, more radically spirit-in-world, and a codetermining factor of the universe itself.
But westerners are afraid of transcending anthropocentrism; the idea that humans are nothing strikes fear into their hearts (pancosmic cold).
Dieke's own two essays, consistent with the idealism he espouses, well explicate aspects of Walker's spiritualist landscapes in The Temple of Familiar and the poetry (although the accumulation of terms like pancosmic symbiosis, the axiology of psychohistory, and th e protean/metapsychean self sometimes has as dizzying mystical reference as Walker's own cosmic lyricism).
For example, Rahner posited various theories regarding the pancosmic soul after death and then later changed this, and Boros's theory still has strong following.
Since you rightly reject the traditional Protestant view of the immortal soul as a Greek deformation of biblical anthropology, would you agree with Rahner that after death the soul retains a relationship to this world that is not necessarily pancosmic and that Aquinas's theory of the anima separata needs refinement?
[Christ] became actually, in his very humanity, what he had always been by his dignity, the heart of the universe, the innermost centre of creation."(34) In his humanity, Christ in death became pancosmic.
He simply proceeded to reinterpret the resurrection of the body, at the end of the world, which he considered a dogma of faith, by means of his theory of the human soul becoming pancosmic in the final consummation.
As Peter Phan has noted,(99) Karl Rahner began to reconsider his earlier theory of the soul becoming pancosmic. In his foreword to Silvano Zucal's La teologia della morte in Karl Rahner,(100) Rahner stated that he had adopted the view Greshake proposed in Naherwartung, Auferstehung, Unsterblichkeit.
Rahner describes this new existence as a transhistorical and pancosmic existence that renders the risen Jesus the transforming center of the world through his Spirit.(67)