pandectist

pandectist

(pænˈdɛktɪst)
n
(Law) a German law student who followed the Pandects of Justinian

pandectist

1. the writer of a complete code of the laws of a country.
2. the writer of a complete digest of materials on a subject.
See also: Law
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References in periodicals archive ?
(67) In drawing this distinction, De Wet drew on more recent thinking in the civilian tradition, and especially on the works of the German Pandectist, Friedrich Carl von Savigny, (68) who incidentally also left his mark on English jurists like Anson and Pollock.
that are based in substance either on Roman law or Pandectist school
In contrast, the Burgerliches Gesetzbuch (BGB) was written for experts by experts (195) steeped in the German legal tradition, which was influenced by the nineteenth-century Pandectist movement, which itself was rooted in Roman law.
This aptness is also confirmed by the technical and historical fact that European socialist countries' legal systems developed well within, or as a ramification of, the civil law tradition, with ancient relations to the Roman and Byzantine tradition and especially influenced, more recently, by the Pandectist legal thought.
(19) The German Pandectist movement was highly influential, both among private law scholars working on the Italian Civil Code, and among public law scholars elaborating the legal principles for unified Italy's new administration.
It is not a coincidence that both the ascendency of the subjective right and the growing rift between substance and procedure culminate in the heyday of individualism and find their most radical formulation in nineteenth-century German Pandectist scholarship, which influenced legal thought in all Continental jurisdictions, including France.
Fifty years ago no one knew a thing about it, one "lived innocently, contentedly, levelling one's artillery only at Pandectist positions." How dramatically things have changed!
It should be noted that the concept of multiple meaning of the concept of a contract has found its realization in the civil codes of many countries, built on pandectists (Germany, France, the Netherlands).
(14) These themes were to re-emerge in his later work; like the Pandectists whose work led to the passing of the German Civil Code in 1900, Maitland saw historical jurisprudence as the essential prelude to legal rationalisation.
(11.) In Germany, on the other hand, the Code of 1900 was more properly the product of the romantic movement that led to states taking over the law, although it is true that the German early 19th century Historical School of von Savigny, also referred to as the School of the Pandectists, is often distinguished.
American legal science was strongly influenced by the German Pandectists, whose work consisted in the conceptual systematization of principles they discovered in their study of the Roman civil law Digest (the Pandectae) and eventually culminated in the promulgation of the German Civil Code of 1896 (the BGB).