panegyric

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pan·e·gyr·ic

 (păn′ə-jĭr′ĭk, -jī′rĭk)
n.
1. A formal eulogistic composition intended as a public compliment.
2. Elaborate praise or laudation; an encomium.

[Latin panēgyricus, from Greek panēgurikos (logos), (speech) at a public assembly, panegyric, from panēguris, public assembly : pan-, pan- + aguris, assembly, marketplace; see ger- in Indo-European roots.]

pan′e·gyr′i·cal adj.
pan′e·gyr′i·cal·ly adv.

panegyric

(ˌpænɪˈdʒɪrɪk)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a formal public commendation; eulogy. Also called (obsolete): panegyry
[C17: via French and Latin from Greek, from panēguris public gathering, from pan- + aguris assembly]
ˌpaneˈgyrical adj
ˌpaneˈgyrically adv
ˌpaneˈgyrist n

pan•e•gyr•ic

(ˌpæn ɪˈdʒɪr ɪk, -ˈdʒaɪ rɪk)

n.
1. a lofty oration or writing in praise of a person or thing; eulogy.
2. formal or elaborate praise.
[1590–1600; < Latin panēgyricus < Greek (lógos) panēgyrikós (speech) at an assembly =panḗgyr(is) solemn assembly (pan- pan- + -ēgyris, comb. form of ágyris gathering; akin to agora1) + -ikos -ic]
pan`e•gyr′i•cal, adj.
pan`e•gyr′i•cal•ly, adv.
pan`e•gyr′ist, n.
pan′e•gy•rize` (-dʒəˌraɪz) v.t., v.i. -rized, -riz•ing.

panegyric

1. a formal speech of praise.
2. any form of enthusiastic praise. — panegyric, panegyrical, adj. — panegyrist, n.
See also: Praise
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.panegyric - a formal expression of praise
congratulations, extolment, kudos, praise - an expression of approval and commendation; "he always appreciated praise for his work"
Adj.1.panegyric - formally expressing praise
complimentary - conveying or resembling a compliment; "a complimentary remark"

panegyric

noun tribute, praise, homage, accolade, eulogy, paean, commendation, encomium It is traditional to deliver a panegyric to the departed.

panegyric

noun
Translations
lovprisinglovtale

panegyric

[ˌpænɪˈdʒɪrɪk] Npanegírico m

panegyric

nLobrede f, → Panegyrikus m (Liter)

panegyric

[ˌpænɪˈdʒɪrɪk] n (frm) → panegirico
References in periodicals archive ?
Now we must praise the Guardian of the kingdom of heaven, The might of the Creator and the thought of His mind, The work of the Father of men, as He, the Eternal Lord, Formed the beginning of every wonder (Caedmon's Hymn) This poem panegyrically presents accounts of creation based on translations of the Old and New Testaments that are included in the Bible which is:
As their most famous scion, Robert Louis, panegyrically put it, "Their works, the salt-encrusted, still survive;/ The sea bombards their founded towers." Just how they managed to leave such a briny vertical legacy is the subject of Bella Bathurst's absorbing chronicle.
While Shakespeare occasionally employed the myth of Trojan origin panegyrically (the tribute to Elizabeth in Midsummer Night's Dream, the prophecy of Cranmer in Henry VIII), in the plays identified as "translations of empire," James sees in his use of multiple sources "an innovative and politically veiled practice" (1) designed to question the imperial ideology of the Tudor and Stuart courts and to develop through the medium of the theater an alternative conception of national identity.