panentheist


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panentheist

(ˌpænɛnˈθiːɪst; pænˈɛnθɪɪst)
n
(Theology) someone who believes that God is a part of the universe as well as transcending it
adj
(Theology) relating to panentheism
Translations
Panentheistin
panenthéiste
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References in periodicals archive ?
He is a Panentheist in the sense of perceiving that we can realize the presence of God only within our most intensely developed spiritual Selves.
Pantheism and Freemasonry can be found amongst pre-Kantians like Gotthold Lessing (Der Freigeist, 1749) (who was both panentheist and Freemason) and Johann Herder (Vom Erkennen und Empfinden der menschlichen Seele, 1778) (who was both).
Golgotha and its theo-anthropo-cosmic interpretation of the Eucharist are distinguished from the panentheist metaphorical interpretation--developed by Sallie McFague and Rosemary Radford Ruether--which regards the cosmos as God's body.
In ecumenical circles it is widely agreed that both creationism and self-explanatory evolutionism are to be avoided, but any deist, theist or panentheist notion of God raises the question of how God's relationship with the world as such may be understood.
Armand Baker has a detailed exploration of Unamuno as a Krausist and panentheist in "The God of Unamuno.
This perspective is used by contemporary authors to develop their ontology in which they explain the evolutionary emergence of new structures by referring to the panentheist presence of God in nature.
Multiple metaphors relating our relationship with God are offered to help explain his panentheist views, including that of waves to the ocean, knots in a rope, and the classic two faces/vase optical illusion.
Writing out of the Reformed tradition, John Cooper makes such a case, critically engaging the adoption of the panentheist approach taken by Hart and so many others.
Perhaps the greatest Jewish thinker of the twentieth century, the late Rabbi Kook, has been rightly called a panentheist.
Just a simple last of his chapters reveals the depth and scope of this volume: (1) Panentheism, The Other God of the Philosophers; (2) Plato through Christian Neoplatonism; (3) Pantheism and Panentheism from Renaissance to Romanticism; (4) Schelling and Hegel; (5) Nineteenth-Century Panentheism; (6) Teilhard's Christocentric Panentheism; (7) Process Theology; (8) Tillch's Existentialism; (9) Twentieth Century Diversity; Moltmann; Pannenberg; Liberation and Ecological Theologies; (10) Panentheism in Theological Cosmology; and finally, (11) Why Cooper is not a Panentheist.
Part 2 includes chapters on Scripture and tradition (Vanhoozer), theological method (Dan Stiver), the Trinity (David Cunningham), God and world (Philip Clayton, rather unconvincingly advocating a panentheist approach), the human person (John Webster, strongly critical of deconstructive anthropology), Christ and salvation (Walter Lowe emphasizing apocalyptic Christology via Paul), ecclesiology (Stanley Grenz), and Pneumatology and spirituality (David Ford).
There are five basic approaches to God: theist, atheist, agnostic, pantheist, and panentheist.